• sunday guide to // valencia

 

Continuing our Sunday guide series, we travel to Valencia. Read on to share in our recommendations on what to see, do and eat before resting your head in one of Spain's most vibrant year-round destinations.


 

see //

Valencia is so diverse that it's certainly not possible to see even a fraction of the sights in just one day. For instance, there are hundreds of plazas across the city, but you can narrow it down by visiting Plaza Redonda. It's is a must-see due to its unusual design and quirky contents. Not a square like most other plazas, Redonda is a circle filled with stalls selling everything from souvenirs to pet birds.

Diving the city almost exactly in half we have the Turia Gardens. After severe flooding in the 1950s, the city conjured up a plan to divert the River Turia outside of the city. From this sprung the need for a regeneration project, turning an empty bed where the Turia river used to run, into the largest urban park in Spain. Here you'll find every variety of small wheeled transport available. Whether you prefer to cycle, blade, hover, skateboard or simply walk, ambling the gardens is a must whilst visiting the city.

If you're willing to venture out of the city, you'll find Albufera about six miles south. One of the most important wetlands in Europe, this is where you'll find the rice grown for all the delicious Valencian Paella. You won't have to venture far to get a taste either - restaurants selling the locally acclaimed dish smatter the lake.

 

 

do // 

If you happen to visit Valencia in the spring, you should try to catch the Les Falles. This traditional festival lands in March and is both spectacular and peculiar in equal measures. The city districts construct statues to exhibit and adorn the city for the week, whilst the people exuberantly throw fireworks and firecrackers in the street. Women dress up in traditional dresses to offer flowers to the Virgin Mary, before joining the men in setting off fireworks around 2 pm during what is called 'mascleta'.

Regardless of the time of year you visit, The City of Arts and Sciences is an architectural and cultural treat created in the diverted Turia river basin. Designed by local architects Santiago Calatrava and Félix Candela, it is a vast area featuring six constructs. El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía is an arts centre and opera house; El Museu de les Ciències Príncipe Felipe the notorious Science museum; L'Hemisfèric contains the planetarium and Imax cinema; L'Umbracle is a landscaped walkway and garden; Oceanografic contains the open-air aquarium or 'oceanographic park'; Ágora is a hosting space used for a variety of events.

 

 

eat //

As previously mentioned, Paella is a big deal in the region. The rice is locally grown and the seafood locally caught, it's worth a try considering you'll probably never have a meal that travels less distance to your plate. The trick is knowing where to find the best one. Many tout the restaurants in the Albufera national park, amongst the rice growing wetlands as the winners, but it's rumoured that Malvarrosa city beach is the place to head in the city.

If it's tapas you seek, be sure to stay out of the main tourist areas. Although the glitzy views can be tempting, a true foodie will listen out for the terraces full of locals speaking only Spanish. These are usually the ones which will be slightly cheaper and a lot more authentic. 

Those who have self-catering accommodation should head to the Central Market to stock up on flavoursome seasonal produce. Not only a feast to pile high on your plate, the art nouveau market is a treat for the eyes. Built in the 1920's and one of the largest in Europe, it's worth a visit to peruse the produce atop the 1000+ stalls.

 

If you enjoyed our post, why not share it via our ready-to-go tweet link. 

 

 

 

images // max rentmeester, igor ovsyannykov, cel lisboa

sunday guide to // valencia

 

Continuing our Sunday guide series, we travel to Valencia. Read on to share in our recommendations on what to see, do and eat before resting your head in one of Spain's most vibrant year-round destinations.


 

see //

Valencia is so diverse that it's certainly not possible to see even a fraction of the sights in just one day. For instance, there are hundreds of plazas across the city, but you can narrow it down by visiting Plaza Redonda. It's is a must-see due to its unusual design and quirky contents. Not a square like most other plazas, Redonda is a circle filled with stalls selling everything from souvenirs to pet birds.

Diving the city almost exactly in half we have the Turia Gardens. After severe flooding in the 1950s, the city conjured up a plan to divert the River Turia outside of the city. From this sprung the need for a regeneration project, turning an empty bed where the Turia river used to run, into the largest urban park in Spain. Here you'll find every variety of small wheeled transport available. Whether you prefer to cycle, blade, hover, skateboard or simply walk, ambling the gardens is a must whilst visiting the city.

If you're willing to venture out of the city, you'll find Albufera about six miles south. One of the most important wetlands in Europe, this is where you'll find the rice grown for all the delicious Valencian Paella. You won't have to venture far to get a taste either - restaurants selling the locally acclaimed dish smatter the lake.

 

 

do // 

If you happen to visit Valencia in the spring, you should try to catch the Les Falles. This traditional festival lands in March and is both spectacular and peculiar in equal measures. The city districts construct statues to exhibit and adorn the city for the week, whilst the people exuberantly throw fireworks and firecrackers in the street. Women dress up in traditional dresses to offer flowers to the Virgin Mary, before joining the men in setting off fireworks around 2 pm during what is called 'mascleta'.

Regardless of the time of year you visit, The City of Arts and Sciences is an architectural and cultural treat created in the diverted Turia river basin. Designed by local architects Santiago Calatrava and Félix Candela, it is a vast area featuring six constructs. El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía is an arts centre and opera house; El Museu de les Ciències Príncipe Felipe the notorious Science museum; L'Hemisfèric contains the planetarium and Imax cinema; L'Umbracle is a landscaped walkway and garden; Oceanografic contains the open-air aquarium or 'oceanographic park'; Ágora is a hosting space used for a variety of events.

 

 

eat //

As previously mentioned, Paella is a big deal in the region. The rice is locally grown and the seafood locally caught, it's worth a try considering you'll probably never have a meal that travels less distance to your plate. The trick is knowing where to find the best one. Many tout the restaurants in the Albufera national park, amongst the rice growing wetlands as the winners, but it's rumoured that Malvarrosa city beach is the place to head in the city.

If it's tapas you seek, be sure to stay out of the main tourist areas. Although the glitzy views can be tempting, a true foodie will listen out for the terraces full of locals speaking only Spanish. These are usually the ones which will be slightly cheaper and a lot more authentic. 

Those who have self-catering accommodation should head to the Central Market to stock up on flavoursome seasonal produce. Not only a feast to pile high on your plate, the art nouveau market is a treat for the eyes. Built in the 1920's and one of the largest in Europe, it's worth a visit to peruse the produce atop the 1000+ stalls.

 

If you enjoyed our post, why not share it via our ready-to-go tweet link. 

 

 

 

images // max rentmeester, igor ovsyannykov, cel lisboa
  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman
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