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It has long been believed that time and money are two of the most important factors in life. Many people find that they never have enough of either. While money can ensure a comfortable life, time is what we often want more of at the end of each day.

 

Considering the technology of today and the accessibility of it at any moment, we spend a remarkable amount of our precious time consuming media. For example, Adweek researched just how much time the average person was spending on social media alone and calculated that we spend an average of 5 years and 4 months of our lives using social media networks. We spend even more time watching television, with an estimate of 7 years and 8 months spent watching our favorite shows. And even more interesting, we spend an average of only 1 year and 3 months of our lives socializing in real life.

 

 photos

 

Given more time, most people would probably continue these screen addiction habits, which is why it can be argued that time is not the most important factor in life. Instead of the idea of always needing more time, we should be more concerned with how we choose to spend our time and what we choose to focus our attention on.

 

The greatest moments of your life won’t be based on a length of time, but on what you did during that time. Consider things like vacations and concerts. We enjoy those memories all our lives, even though they may have lasted a few days or a few hours, because it was time spent doing something you really wanted and greatly appreciated in the moment. In fact, pursuing experiences we really enjoy is beneficial to our overall health.

 

concert 

Not every day can be a vacation or a life-altering experience, but there are ways to get more out of your time than consuming endless amounts of media. Try focusing on things you enjoy and getting in touch with your own mind. Take the time detach from media for some time each day, sit back in your mahabis slippers and relax, practice meditation to clear your mind of stress and distractions, and focus on tasks at hand rather than juggling more than you can handle. These little fixes can help you spend your time with purpose, even on those days that consist of a 9-hour work day and take out at home.

 

 

 

scroll less. look more.

 

It has long been believed that time and money are two of the most important factors in life. Many people find that they never have enough of either. While money can ensure a comfortable life, time is what we often want more of at the end of each day.

 

Considering the technology of today and the accessibility of it at any moment, we spend a remarkable amount of our precious time consuming media. For example, Adweek researched just how much time the average person was spending on social media alone and calculated that we spend an average of 5 years and 4 months of our lives using social media networks. We spend even more time watching television, with an estimate of 7 years and 8 months spent watching our favorite shows. And even more interesting, we spend an average of only 1 year and 3 months of our lives socializing in real life.

 

 photos

 

Given more time, most people would probably continue these screen addiction habits, which is why it can be argued that time is not the most important factor in life. Instead of the idea of always needing more time, we should be more concerned with how we choose to spend our time and what we choose to focus our attention on.

 

The greatest moments of your life won’t be based on a length of time, but on what you did during that time. Consider things like vacations and concerts. We enjoy those memories all our lives, even though they may have lasted a few days or a few hours, because it was time spent doing something you really wanted and greatly appreciated in the moment. In fact, pursuing experiences we really enjoy is beneficial to our overall health.

 

concert 

Not every day can be a vacation or a life-altering experience, but there are ways to get more out of your time than consuming endless amounts of media. Try focusing on things you enjoy and getting in touch with your own mind. Take the time detach from media for some time each day, sit back in your mahabis slippers and relax, practice meditation to clear your mind of stress and distractions, and focus on tasks at hand rather than juggling more than you can handle. These little fixes can help you spend your time with purpose, even on those days that consist of a 9-hour work day and take out at home.

 

 

 

  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman