• make time for downtime

 

Most of us can relate to bragging about how busy we are, or comparing notes with friends regarding how little sleep we get, we reel off endless lists of all the things we must get done. As we roll our eyes It seems like we are complaining, but somewhere deep down, there is also a smattering of smugness. As a modern-day culture, we tend to be obsessed with busyness and those who have the most to do, are the ones we hold in the highest regard. 

The Harvard Business Review conducted a study to see if people perceived busy individuals as having higher status over those who took time out. The results fell in favour of those with barely enough time to peel an orange – they were regarded as the tour de force of success. 

 

make time for downtime

 

Yet, surely the true success should lie with those who can efficiently manage their time? Heather Greenwood Davis, a travel blogger who cut ties with the busy office life to reconnect with herself, reminds us all to ‘Be greedy about your time. Take it back from the people or things that would threaten to squander it.’ It’s important to note that the person squandering most of your time could be yourself.

Everything in our modern world is geared towards achievement – from fighting for Instagram likes to apps and life hacks that promise to be timesavers. Yet, even if we were to be granted that precious extra time what would we do with it? Spend it researching online for even more lifehacks, apps, and ways to fill that time we have managed to mine?

Brene Brown author of Daring Greatly believes that we use being busy as our armour against the world and to protect ourselves from being forced to stop a second and reflect. Rather than confront our sensibilities we can just stay busy, reshuffle the papers, and push those thoughts to the bottom of the to do pile.

 

make time for downtime

 

Downtime, real honest and authentic downtime away from the constant blinkering of our screens is important for our mental health. Not only does it give us time to process our thoughts and feelings, but it also helps us to tap into our inner creativity and imagination. You can’t just crash into downtime, so here are a couple of ways in which you can naturally start reintroducing it to your everyday life.

- Set up an internet timer that cuts off your online use after 6pm. Instead of endless trawling you can take time to cook or pick up a good book.

- Don’t use headphones to listen to podcasts or music when walking, rather than distracting yourself – allow time and space for your own thoughts.

- Stop multitasking, no- one is a superhuman.

 

Start your downtime today, with mahabis slippers. 

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet. 

make time for downtime

 

Most of us can relate to bragging about how busy we are, or comparing notes with friends regarding how little sleep we get, we reel off endless lists of all the things we must get done. As we roll our eyes It seems like we are complaining, but somewhere deep down, there is also a smattering of smugness. As a modern-day culture, we tend to be obsessed with busyness and those who have the most to do, are the ones we hold in the highest regard. 

The Harvard Business Review conducted a study to see if people perceived busy individuals as having higher status over those who took time out. The results fell in favour of those with barely enough time to peel an orange – they were regarded as the tour de force of success. 

 

make time for downtime

 

Yet, surely the true success should lie with those who can efficiently manage their time? Heather Greenwood Davis, a travel blogger who cut ties with the busy office life to reconnect with herself, reminds us all to ‘Be greedy about your time. Take it back from the people or things that would threaten to squander it.’ It’s important to note that the person squandering most of your time could be yourself.

Everything in our modern world is geared towards achievement – from fighting for Instagram likes to apps and life hacks that promise to be timesavers. Yet, even if we were to be granted that precious extra time what would we do with it? Spend it researching online for even more lifehacks, apps, and ways to fill that time we have managed to mine?

Brene Brown author of Daring Greatly believes that we use being busy as our armour against the world and to protect ourselves from being forced to stop a second and reflect. Rather than confront our sensibilities we can just stay busy, reshuffle the papers, and push those thoughts to the bottom of the to do pile.

 

make time for downtime

 

Downtime, real honest and authentic downtime away from the constant blinkering of our screens is important for our mental health. Not only does it give us time to process our thoughts and feelings, but it also helps us to tap into our inner creativity and imagination. You can’t just crash into downtime, so here are a couple of ways in which you can naturally start reintroducing it to your everyday life.

- Set up an internet timer that cuts off your online use after 6pm. Instead of endless trawling you can take time to cook or pick up a good book.

- Don’t use headphones to listen to podcasts or music when walking, rather than distracting yourself – allow time and space for your own thoughts.

- Stop multitasking, no- one is a superhuman.

 

Start your downtime today, with mahabis slippers. 

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet. 

  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman
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