• how procrastination can change your life for the better

 

“Because if you don't know how to manage time, time can rule you like a tyrant.” ― Frank Partnoy, Wait: The Useful Art of Procrastination

 

Every day we make 35000 decisions, some refer to the colour of our socks, others to investing heavily in the stock market, some to just bagel toppings. Decisions are a major part of our life, but they also cause a ripple effect that reaches out to touch others. Experts like Frank Partnoy argue that procrastination helps us to make better, well thought out, and more informed decisions in life.

In the modern world we abhor procrastination, if we catch ourselves doing it, we are quick to call ourselves to task to make up for that lingering time. But Greeks and Romans adored procrastination, the great thinkers and philosophers of the time would often be found sitting gazing into space. This all ground to a halt during the puritanical times, when suddenly the mantra of ‘idle hands and devil’s plaything’ became a common uttered phrase.

 

procrastination

 

Type procrastination into your search engine and there are a million articles and life hacks telling you exactly how to stop it. Psychology Today infers that it reflects our perennial struggle with self-control. Yet, Partnoy tells us a different tale, that procrastination can and should be practiced well. This isn’t an excuse to kick back on the couch all day every day, but rather to practice not making snap decisions or judgements.

When faced with a decision, rather than jump in with a jerk reaction, it may be best to ask yourself two questions. Rather than going straight to the ‘what should I do’ part of the situation, Partnoy suggests asking first ‘how much time do I have to make this decision’. Decision making should be at least a two-step process.

 

procrastination

 

When you don’t respond to the worlds questions straightaway you make your own life easier. Rather than committing to things you don’t want to do, wondering if you made the right choice, or dwelling on the answer you gave, you push all that away. You may think you would spend that excess time going back and forth on the decision, but you should do other things instead. Next time you need to decide something – take a breath, walk, read a book, and slowly you will process the answer. Chances are it will be a much more honest answer than it would if you had leaped into a decision. This, is the art of procrastination.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

photos via unsplash

how procrastination can change your life for the better

 

“Because if you don't know how to manage time, time can rule you like a tyrant.” ― Frank Partnoy, Wait: The Useful Art of Procrastination

 

Every day we make 35000 decisions, some refer to the colour of our socks, others to investing heavily in the stock market, some to just bagel toppings. Decisions are a major part of our life, but they also cause a ripple effect that reaches out to touch others. Experts like Frank Partnoy argue that procrastination helps us to make better, well thought out, and more informed decisions in life.

In the modern world we abhor procrastination, if we catch ourselves doing it, we are quick to call ourselves to task to make up for that lingering time. But Greeks and Romans adored procrastination, the great thinkers and philosophers of the time would often be found sitting gazing into space. This all ground to a halt during the puritanical times, when suddenly the mantra of ‘idle hands and devil’s plaything’ became a common uttered phrase.

 

procrastination

 

Type procrastination into your search engine and there are a million articles and life hacks telling you exactly how to stop it. Psychology Today infers that it reflects our perennial struggle with self-control. Yet, Partnoy tells us a different tale, that procrastination can and should be practiced well. This isn’t an excuse to kick back on the couch all day every day, but rather to practice not making snap decisions or judgements.

When faced with a decision, rather than jump in with a jerk reaction, it may be best to ask yourself two questions. Rather than going straight to the ‘what should I do’ part of the situation, Partnoy suggests asking first ‘how much time do I have to make this decision’. Decision making should be at least a two-step process.

 

procrastination

 

When you don’t respond to the worlds questions straightaway you make your own life easier. Rather than committing to things you don’t want to do, wondering if you made the right choice, or dwelling on the answer you gave, you push all that away. You may think you would spend that excess time going back and forth on the decision, but you should do other things instead. Next time you need to decide something – take a breath, walk, read a book, and slowly you will process the answer. Chances are it will be a much more honest answer than it would if you had leaped into a decision. This, is the art of procrastination.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

photos via unsplash
  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman
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