• mahabis journal // spring traditions around the world

 

Spring as a season offers many things. The change in daylight savings, the blue reappearing in the sky and the flowers emerging from the ground signify the end of winter. For some places, it also indicates the future success of the harvest and new life. Many cultures celebrate with parties, fiestas, and traditions as they enter the new season. We share with you our favourites from around the world. 

 

Holi festival // india

Likely one of the most famous festivals of spring, the Holi colour festival, originating in India, is highly photogenic due to its vibrant nature. It is celebrated with street parties, parades and festivals in which everybody throws colourful chalk powder. Its uplifting nature has now spread around the world. With western cities such as Berlin, Utah, and London now throwing colour to signify the prominence of good over evil, and to have fun make friendships and let go of negativity.

 

 

spring equinox // england

For those who don't know, Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument situated in the south west of England, close to Salisbury. It's understood to have been built 5000 years ago, but the builders and purpose remain a mystery. Each year at the spring solstice, almost 1000 people gather to watch the sunrise above the stones. A tradition with beginnings in pagan and druid history, it has become popular for those who would like to feel a spiritual link to their predecessors.

 



manhattanhenge // new york city

An interesting spin-off of the Stonehenge solstice gathering (without the spiritual connotations) is that dubbed 'Manhattanhenge'. Twice a year the sun aligns with the east-west grid of Manhattan, allowing a stunning sunset between the skyscrapers. It is wondered what civilisation will think in thousands of years of the city grid that aligns perfectly around the solstice, as we ponder Stonehenge.

 



songkran water festival // thailand

The name of the festival derives from a Sanskrit word translating to 'transformation' or 'change'. Literally the festival of the change of seasons, traditionally it's celebrated with some truly lovely traditions. These include the offering of food to the temples and monks who live there and the pouring of water on buddha statues and elders hands to wash away bad luck. These days, although old traditions still arise, it is celebrated less formally with parades and colourful festivals in which people splash one another with water and dance.

 

 

hanami cherry blossom // japan

Originating in Japan, the cherry blossom festivals we see widespread internationally are traditionally called 'hanami' which means 'flower viewing'. The period of hanami lasts for around two weeks each year (somewhere between March and May) and is planned according to the 'blossom forecast'. In some places yozakura is also observed, which is essentially the appreciation of the blooms at night, lit by paper lanterns. Appreciation of this beauty in festival form can now be found in Vancouver, San Francisco and Georgia to name but a few. 

 

images // maxime bhm, antonina bukowska, jj harrison, sevtibidou

 

If you enjoyed our post why not retweet it via our ready-to-go tweet.

mahabis journal // spring traditions around the world

 

Spring as a season offers many things. The change in daylight savings, the blue reappearing in the sky and the flowers emerging from the ground signify the end of winter. For some places, it also indicates the future success of the harvest and new life. Many cultures celebrate with parties, fiestas, and traditions as they enter the new season. We share with you our favourites from around the world. 

 

Holi festival // india

Likely one of the most famous festivals of spring, the Holi colour festival, originating in India, is highly photogenic due to its vibrant nature. It is celebrated with street parties, parades and festivals in which everybody throws colourful chalk powder. Its uplifting nature has now spread around the world. With western cities such as Berlin, Utah, and London now throwing colour to signify the prominence of good over evil, and to have fun make friendships and let go of negativity.

 

 

spring equinox // england

For those who don't know, Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument situated in the south west of England, close to Salisbury. It's understood to have been built 5000 years ago, but the builders and purpose remain a mystery. Each year at the spring solstice, almost 1000 people gather to watch the sunrise above the stones. A tradition with beginnings in pagan and druid history, it has become popular for those who would like to feel a spiritual link to their predecessors.

 



manhattanhenge // new york city

An interesting spin-off of the Stonehenge solstice gathering (without the spiritual connotations) is that dubbed 'Manhattanhenge'. Twice a year the sun aligns with the east-west grid of Manhattan, allowing a stunning sunset between the skyscrapers. It is wondered what civilisation will think in thousands of years of the city grid that aligns perfectly around the solstice, as we ponder Stonehenge.

 



songkran water festival // thailand

The name of the festival derives from a Sanskrit word translating to 'transformation' or 'change'. Literally the festival of the change of seasons, traditionally it's celebrated with some truly lovely traditions. These include the offering of food to the temples and monks who live there and the pouring of water on buddha statues and elders hands to wash away bad luck. These days, although old traditions still arise, it is celebrated less formally with parades and colourful festivals in which people splash one another with water and dance.

 

 

hanami cherry blossom // japan

Originating in Japan, the cherry blossom festivals we see widespread internationally are traditionally called 'hanami' which means 'flower viewing'. The period of hanami lasts for around two weeks each year (somewhere between March and May) and is planned according to the 'blossom forecast'. In some places yozakura is also observed, which is essentially the appreciation of the blooms at night, lit by paper lanterns. Appreciation of this beauty in festival form can now be found in Vancouver, San Francisco and Georgia to name but a few. 

 

images // maxime bhm, antonina bukowska, jj harrison, sevtibidou

 

If you enjoyed our post why not retweet it via our ready-to-go tweet.

  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman
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