• mahabis lifestyle // dining culture around the world

Here in the UK and in America, it’s often customary to eat your dinner on the sofa whilst catching up on your favourite TV show. If you have guests, you may set the table and indulge in dinner time conversation, but allocating an hour each evening to simply sitting and dining has generally become a thing of the past. In order to reclaim our meal times and get used to enjoying our food rather than rushing through it, we’re taking a look to other cultures to see what good habits we can pick up.

 

mahabis guide // dining culture around the world 

 

spain //

Lunch is typically the largest meal of the day in Spain, coinciding with their siesta. In smaller Spanish towns, many people still take a 2-3 hour break in the middle of the day to rest, although it is more likely that they will return home to enjoy a prolonged meal with their family rather than taking a nap. Lunch is normally served after 1.30pm, and includes several courses intercepted by large glasses of red wine. Rather than rushing through the different courses, Spaniards take their time over lunch, indulging in lingering conversation and savouring the taste of their dishes.

 

dinner culture around the world // mahabis journal

 

 

italy //

Eating a large meal in the middle of the day followed by a lighter late supper is typical to other Mediterranean cultures, including Italy. Again, Italians like to linger over their meals and often enjoy at least two courses for lunch. Most Italians who work close to home will take a long lunch break to return home and enjoy their lunchtime meal with their families. In the larger cities where people typically have longer commutes to work, families will enjoy a lingering multiple-course meal in the evenings instead, using the opportunity to catch up about their days. 

 

israel //

Jewish households all around the world observe the Sabbath from sundown on Friday until sundown on Saturday. Friday nights are subsequently reserved for relaxing meal times with the entire family, where everyone is encouraged to unplug from technology and to enjoy the company. The table is set, candles are lit and conversation constantly flows around the table during the meal.

 

mahabis guide // dining culture

 

china //

Many cultures around the world encourage people to come together and share a variety of dishes from one table (tapas, meze, etc.) but the most iconic meal time ritual has to be dim sum. Originating from the Silk Road, where teahouses would host both travellers and farmers, dim sum has evolved to become a time-honoured tradition that is enjoyed all around the world. Typically served as brunch, the small rolls, dumplings and buns are presented in bamboo containers, designed for a group of family and friends to sit around a table together and share.

 

dinner culture around the world // mahabis journal

 

 

What can we learn from other cultures?

  • Why not take more time over meals, rather than rushing, using it as an excuse for conversation, catching up with your family and friends
  • Make an effort at weekends to sit down and enjoy lunch as a family, rather than grabbing a snack on the go
  • Dine up to the table, rather than in front of the TV
  • Set aside one evening a week for a formal dinner where everyone sits around the table and enjoys each other’s company
  • Prepare meals such as tapas, meze or dim sum that are designed to be shared, creating a more social dining occasion

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link.

photos: via unsplash

mahabis lifestyle // dining culture around the world

Here in the UK and in America, it’s often customary to eat your dinner on the sofa whilst catching up on your favourite TV show. If you have guests, you may set the table and indulge in dinner time conversation, but allocating an hour each evening to simply sitting and dining has generally become a thing of the past. In order to reclaim our meal times and get used to enjoying our food rather than rushing through it, we’re taking a look to other cultures to see what good habits we can pick up.

 

mahabis guide // dining culture around the world 

 

spain //

Lunch is typically the largest meal of the day in Spain, coinciding with their siesta. In smaller Spanish towns, many people still take a 2-3 hour break in the middle of the day to rest, although it is more likely that they will return home to enjoy a prolonged meal with their family rather than taking a nap. Lunch is normally served after 1.30pm, and includes several courses intercepted by large glasses of red wine. Rather than rushing through the different courses, Spaniards take their time over lunch, indulging in lingering conversation and savouring the taste of their dishes.

 

dinner culture around the world // mahabis journal

 

 

italy //

Eating a large meal in the middle of the day followed by a lighter late supper is typical to other Mediterranean cultures, including Italy. Again, Italians like to linger over their meals and often enjoy at least two courses for lunch. Most Italians who work close to home will take a long lunch break to return home and enjoy their lunchtime meal with their families. In the larger cities where people typically have longer commutes to work, families will enjoy a lingering multiple-course meal in the evenings instead, using the opportunity to catch up about their days. 

 

israel //

Jewish households all around the world observe the Sabbath from sundown on Friday until sundown on Saturday. Friday nights are subsequently reserved for relaxing meal times with the entire family, where everyone is encouraged to unplug from technology and to enjoy the company. The table is set, candles are lit and conversation constantly flows around the table during the meal.

 

mahabis guide // dining culture

 

china //

Many cultures around the world encourage people to come together and share a variety of dishes from one table (tapas, meze, etc.) but the most iconic meal time ritual has to be dim sum. Originating from the Silk Road, where teahouses would host both travellers and farmers, dim sum has evolved to become a time-honoured tradition that is enjoyed all around the world. Typically served as brunch, the small rolls, dumplings and buns are presented in bamboo containers, designed for a group of family and friends to sit around a table together and share.

 

dinner culture around the world // mahabis journal

 

 

What can we learn from other cultures?

  • Why not take more time over meals, rather than rushing, using it as an excuse for conversation, catching up with your family and friends
  • Make an effort at weekends to sit down and enjoy lunch as a family, rather than grabbing a snack on the go
  • Dine up to the table, rather than in front of the TV
  • Set aside one evening a week for a formal dinner where everyone sits around the table and enjoys each other’s company
  • Prepare meals such as tapas, meze or dim sum that are designed to be shared, creating a more social dining occasion

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link.

photos: via unsplash
  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman
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