• the slow movement renaissance // unwind with mahabis

"Stop the world, I want to get off."

Whilst this phrase most famously lends its title to a broadway musical, it’s also an apt anecdote for 21st century life. In this age, we’re continually catching up with the treadmill of life, and it’s no surprise that ‘the slow movement’ has emerged as a result.

 
photo: matthew wiebe

 

At mahabis, we think there’s a lot to learn from taking time out and winding down. But when jobs need doing and time keeps moving, the cultural shift towards ‘slowing down’ life’s pace can sound… well, a little optimistic.

However, plenty of people are suggesting otherwise. 

The slow movement, which emerged in the mid 80s, describes a range of global efforts focused on 'taking time out' and combatting the fast-paced and commodity obsessed world we live in. In recent years, the movement has made a swift comeback with more people than ever advocating a walk in the slow lane. 

"The slow life picks up speed"- NY Times

 

photo: calvin chin

 

Geir Berthelsen has taken on this philosophy by storm. Founder of The World Institute of Slowness, a slow movement think tank, Berthelsen has worked since 1999 to apply this philosophy to everything from chocolate to corporations.

 

 

Berthelsen advises that the best thinking, and indeed the best moments in life, can be secured by taking time out. Brilliantly put by comedienne Lily Tomlin: "for fast-acting relief, try slowing down". We can’t help but agree. Downtime is essential to the mahabis lifestyle. And we’ve set out to reimagine the way in which we relax. 

When the world is moving too fast, home is often the sanctuary that we return to. It’s where we relax, and where we go when we’ve stopped trying to change the world.

For us, the comfort of home is embodied in the slipper. And this feeling can be taken with you, wherever you are. When you slip into your mahabis at the end of a long day, you’re sliding into the slow lane. The complexities of the day fade away, and you can enjoy the evening with ease. 

 

 

So, for those times when you want to sit back, put your feet up and watch the world go by, look no further.

It’s time to stop hurrying and enjoy taking time out to unwind. 

 

the slow movement renaissance // unwind with mahabis

"Stop the world, I want to get off."

Whilst this phrase most famously lends its title to a broadway musical, it’s also an apt anecdote for 21st century life. In this age, we’re continually catching up with the treadmill of life, and it’s no surprise that ‘the slow movement’ has emerged as a result.

 
photo: matthew wiebe

 

At mahabis, we think there’s a lot to learn from taking time out and winding down. But when jobs need doing and time keeps moving, the cultural shift towards ‘slowing down’ life’s pace can sound… well, a little optimistic.

However, plenty of people are suggesting otherwise. 

The slow movement, which emerged in the mid 80s, describes a range of global efforts focused on 'taking time out' and combatting the fast-paced and commodity obsessed world we live in. In recent years, the movement has made a swift comeback with more people than ever advocating a walk in the slow lane. 

"The slow life picks up speed"- NY Times

 

photo: calvin chin

 

Geir Berthelsen has taken on this philosophy by storm. Founder of The World Institute of Slowness, a slow movement think tank, Berthelsen has worked since 1999 to apply this philosophy to everything from chocolate to corporations.

 

 

Berthelsen advises that the best thinking, and indeed the best moments in life, can be secured by taking time out. Brilliantly put by comedienne Lily Tomlin: "for fast-acting relief, try slowing down". We can’t help but agree. Downtime is essential to the mahabis lifestyle. And we’ve set out to reimagine the way in which we relax. 

When the world is moving too fast, home is often the sanctuary that we return to. It’s where we relax, and where we go when we’ve stopped trying to change the world.

For us, the comfort of home is embodied in the slipper. And this feeling can be taken with you, wherever you are. When you slip into your mahabis at the end of a long day, you’re sliding into the slow lane. The complexities of the day fade away, and you can enjoy the evening with ease. 

 

 

So, for those times when you want to sit back, put your feet up and watch the world go by, look no further.

It’s time to stop hurrying and enjoy taking time out to unwind. 

 

  • Alice Apsey
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