• mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of ‘mysa’

perfect mysa // mahabis journalphoto: lya leslie

 

We’ve previously discussed untranslatable words that cannot be summed up into one word in the English language. Complementary to their relaxed pace of life, Swedes have many words that sum up the experience of relaxing and enjoying the company of others. Our readers will already know about fika, but ‘mysa’ may be a new word for your Swedish vocabulary.

Whereas fika is all about taking a break and relaxing over a cup of coffee and a cinnamon bun, mysa roughly translates as returning home, getting yourself comfortable and hanging out. The closest possible translation to English would be ‘making yourself cosy’. 

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of mysaphoto: evencki

 

Mysa can be coming home from a day at work, cooking dinner with your partner, snuggling up on the sofa under a pile of blankets and watching a film. It could be running yourself a luxurious bath, lighting a couple of candles and lying back with a good book. It could be inviting a couple of friends to visit you at home, pouring them glasses of wine and sitting with your feet tucked up, engaging in casual conversation. It can be getting together with your family and enjoying quality time spent together relaxing and enjoying each other’s company.

All you need for mysa is to feel completely relaxed, comfortable and content; enjoying yourself at a slow and calming pace whilst allowing yourself to fully unwind.

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of mysaphoto: siebe warmoeskerken

 

Perhaps the reason that we don’t have direct translations for these Swedish terms is because we, as a nation, don’t dedicate enough of our time to relaxation. We are known for rushing around and trying to cram as much as possible into our days, whereas our Swedish counterparts prefer to take things more slowly, and always make time for unwinding. In order to fully appreciate mysa, we need to dedicate more ‘me’ time.

If you’re based in a large city, such as London, ‘me’ time can be scarce. More often than not, you find yourself rushing to work, grabbing a quick lunch, working late, rushing to meet a friend, and returning home only to immediately crash out in bed. Work, eat, socialise, sleep, repeat.

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of mysaphoto: inspire de

 

Taking time out for yourself is essential in order to get to grips with mysa. Give yourself a couple of evenings off in the week, when you finish work on time and head straight home to get nice and cosy and enjoy your own company at home. Rather than always meeting your friends in restaurants or bars, invite a group round to your home and keep the wine flowing. Make time to cook for one another. Run a bath instead of hopping in the shower. Make a date with the sofa and your favourite TV box set once a week.

In order to claim mysa, you need to cast aside any stress and worries and concentrate on resting and relaxing. Don’t think about work or bills, keep conversation light and casual. The whole purpose of mysa is to be completely comfortable in order to fully unwind, something that applies mentally as well as physically. Lounging on the sofa in your pyjamas isn't enough, you need to allow your brain to relax as well. Let yourself completely switch off and unwind. Cast aside any distractions or discomfort.

Slip into your mahabis, put your feet up, clear your mind, and allow mysa to commence. 

 

Share the concept of mysa with your friends, and set aside some ultimate downtime. Just click on this ready-to-go tweet

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of ‘mysa’

perfect mysa // mahabis journalphoto: lya leslie

 

We’ve previously discussed untranslatable words that cannot be summed up into one word in the English language. Complementary to their relaxed pace of life, Swedes have many words that sum up the experience of relaxing and enjoying the company of others. Our readers will already know about fika, but ‘mysa’ may be a new word for your Swedish vocabulary.

Whereas fika is all about taking a break and relaxing over a cup of coffee and a cinnamon bun, mysa roughly translates as returning home, getting yourself comfortable and hanging out. The closest possible translation to English would be ‘making yourself cosy’. 

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of mysaphoto: evencki

 

Mysa can be coming home from a day at work, cooking dinner with your partner, snuggling up on the sofa under a pile of blankets and watching a film. It could be running yourself a luxurious bath, lighting a couple of candles and lying back with a good book. It could be inviting a couple of friends to visit you at home, pouring them glasses of wine and sitting with your feet tucked up, engaging in casual conversation. It can be getting together with your family and enjoying quality time spent together relaxing and enjoying each other’s company.

All you need for mysa is to feel completely relaxed, comfortable and content; enjoying yourself at a slow and calming pace whilst allowing yourself to fully unwind.

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of mysaphoto: siebe warmoeskerken

 

Perhaps the reason that we don’t have direct translations for these Swedish terms is because we, as a nation, don’t dedicate enough of our time to relaxation. We are known for rushing around and trying to cram as much as possible into our days, whereas our Swedish counterparts prefer to take things more slowly, and always make time for unwinding. In order to fully appreciate mysa, we need to dedicate more ‘me’ time.

If you’re based in a large city, such as London, ‘me’ time can be scarce. More often than not, you find yourself rushing to work, grabbing a quick lunch, working late, rushing to meet a friend, and returning home only to immediately crash out in bed. Work, eat, socialise, sleep, repeat.

 

mahabis guide // how to embrace the swedish concept of mysaphoto: inspire de

 

Taking time out for yourself is essential in order to get to grips with mysa. Give yourself a couple of evenings off in the week, when you finish work on time and head straight home to get nice and cosy and enjoy your own company at home. Rather than always meeting your friends in restaurants or bars, invite a group round to your home and keep the wine flowing. Make time to cook for one another. Run a bath instead of hopping in the shower. Make a date with the sofa and your favourite TV box set once a week.

In order to claim mysa, you need to cast aside any stress and worries and concentrate on resting and relaxing. Don’t think about work or bills, keep conversation light and casual. The whole purpose of mysa is to be completely comfortable in order to fully unwind, something that applies mentally as well as physically. Lounging on the sofa in your pyjamas isn't enough, you need to allow your brain to relax as well. Let yourself completely switch off and unwind. Cast aside any distractions or discomfort.

Slip into your mahabis, put your feet up, clear your mind, and allow mysa to commence. 

 

Share the concept of mysa with your friends, and set aside some ultimate downtime. Just click on this ready-to-go tweet

 

  • Emma Lavelle
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