• three ways to buy time this festive season

 

so you can spend more time at home with loved ones (and in your slippers)

 

 

 

we all begin on equal ground with 168 hours in a week. we're left with 128 after a 40-hour work week. maybe trim that down to 120 once you factor in the commute and overtime. if you're lucky enough to get eight hours of sleep each night, you're left with 64 hours.  32 of those remaining 64 hours are constrained to the weekend, while the other half are spread among the weekdays. 

 

so it's no surprise that we all count down the time until the weekend because we feel the need to cram five days worth of “free time” into just two days. 32 hours over five weekdays equates to six hours and 24 minutes per day of free time. yet, when was the last time you felt you had nearly six and a half hours of free time on a workday? 

 

as a company who makes footwear specifically for these few hours of downtime each day, we want to help people maximise the time they spend at home, in their slippers, doing the things they love with the people they love. so here are three methods for buying more time for yourself this silly season; optimization, taking action and outsourcing. 

 

 

 

  spend a few minutes planning your week

optimisation

 

modern life is no stranger to multi-tasking, but the quality of completing multiple tasks at a time can vary greatly. in order to optimise your time, invest just a little of it one day a week to plan ahead. 

 

for example, meal planning can save you hours during the week by removing indecision. invest in some good tupperware, cook in bulk, and you can have meals ready in advance that are likely to be healthier and less expensive. the time it takes to cook chicken, rice, and vegetables is the same for one chicken breast as it is for five. the time saved from having to cook or travel to buy a meal can be better spent on things that give you greater pleasure, like planning upcoming festivities. 

 

 

 

 

try making the mahabis slow-cooked ham recipe


taking action

 

 you may think that making the most of your free time requires loads of motivation, which is hard to drum up at the end of a long workday, especially when Netflix is calling or christmas drinks are planned in. but motivation will follow if you take action. 

 

Mark Manson, the author of self-improvement book the Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, explains this in his free self-discipline book. he writes that if you lack motivation all you have to do is something. because this action will give you inspiration, which you can harness to motivate yourself to take further actions.

 

so pick anything from your "fun to-do list" (the one you may have created during lockdown) and just do it. it could be hand making decorations, trying a new recipe (we recommend our slow cooked ham recipe), or baking something particularly tricky (like a midweek croque-en-bouche).  

 

even if your tower of choux buns topples, you'll feel productive for spending your free time doing something on your terms, rather than scrolling your phone, working, or doing life admin, and you’ll be motivated to use more of your time for yourself and your family. 

 

 

 outsource your chores so you can spend more time doing the things you love


outsourcing

a study titled buying time promotes happiness explores how time-saving purchases can be more rewarding than material purchases. the author of the study, Elizabeth Dunn, found that "buying yourself out of [tasks] like mowing the lawn or cleaning the bathroom — these were pretty small, mundane expenditures, and yet we see them making a difference in people's happiness,"

 

so think about what daily tasks you can feasibly outsource; virtual assistants can manage emails and scheduling, laundry services can pick up and return your washing, and there are even personal stylists who will take care of your wardrobe for as little as £10 a shop. in short, spend your money outsourcing so you can spend more time on yourself. 

 

hopefully by having more time, and feeling in control of those 168 hours that we have each week, we are able to live a happier life. reclaiming that time, whether that be through ‘buying’ it back with time saving purchases, or prioritising the time you have to yourself more than we usually do, we can optimise those precious 168 hours to the max, and notice the benefits. 

 

so, why not take that taxi or grab that ready made meal, and then enjoy putting your feet up in your mahabis slippers for that little bit longer. we all have the same number of hours in a week, so it’s up to us to use them well. 

 

 

 

three ways to buy time this festive season

 

so you can spend more time at home with loved ones (and in your slippers)

 

 

 

we all begin on equal ground with 168 hours in a week. we're left with 128 after a 40-hour work week. maybe trim that down to 120 once you factor in the commute and overtime. if you're lucky enough to get eight hours of sleep each night, you're left with 64 hours.  32 of those remaining 64 hours are constrained to the weekend, while the other half are spread among the weekdays. 

 

so it's no surprise that we all count down the time until the weekend because we feel the need to cram five days worth of “free time” into just two days. 32 hours over five weekdays equates to six hours and 24 minutes per day of free time. yet, when was the last time you felt you had nearly six and a half hours of free time on a workday? 

 

as a company who makes footwear specifically for these few hours of downtime each day, we want to help people maximise the time they spend at home, in their slippers, doing the things they love with the people they love. so here are three methods for buying more time for yourself this silly season; optimization, taking action and outsourcing. 

 

 

 

  spend a few minutes planning your week

optimisation

 

modern life is no stranger to multi-tasking, but the quality of completing multiple tasks at a time can vary greatly. in order to optimise your time, invest just a little of it one day a week to plan ahead. 

 

for example, meal planning can save you hours during the week by removing indecision. invest in some good tupperware, cook in bulk, and you can have meals ready in advance that are likely to be healthier and less expensive. the time it takes to cook chicken, rice, and vegetables is the same for one chicken breast as it is for five. the time saved from having to cook or travel to buy a meal can be better spent on things that give you greater pleasure, like planning upcoming festivities. 

 

 

 

 

try making the mahabis slow-cooked ham recipe


taking action

 

 you may think that making the most of your free time requires loads of motivation, which is hard to drum up at the end of a long workday, especially when Netflix is calling or christmas drinks are planned in. but motivation will follow if you take action. 

 

Mark Manson, the author of self-improvement book the Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, explains this in his free self-discipline book. he writes that if you lack motivation all you have to do is something. because this action will give you inspiration, which you can harness to motivate yourself to take further actions.

 

so pick anything from your "fun to-do list" (the one you may have created during lockdown) and just do it. it could be hand making decorations, trying a new recipe (we recommend our slow cooked ham recipe), or baking something particularly tricky (like a midweek croque-en-bouche).  

 

even if your tower of choux buns topples, you'll feel productive for spending your free time doing something on your terms, rather than scrolling your phone, working, or doing life admin, and you’ll be motivated to use more of your time for yourself and your family. 

 

 

 outsource your chores so you can spend more time doing the things you love


outsourcing

a study titled buying time promotes happiness explores how time-saving purchases can be more rewarding than material purchases. the author of the study, Elizabeth Dunn, found that "buying yourself out of [tasks] like mowing the lawn or cleaning the bathroom — these were pretty small, mundane expenditures, and yet we see them making a difference in people's happiness,"

 

so think about what daily tasks you can feasibly outsource; virtual assistants can manage emails and scheduling, laundry services can pick up and return your washing, and there are even personal stylists who will take care of your wardrobe for as little as £10 a shop. in short, spend your money outsourcing so you can spend more time on yourself. 

 

hopefully by having more time, and feeling in control of those 168 hours that we have each week, we are able to live a happier life. reclaiming that time, whether that be through ‘buying’ it back with time saving purchases, or prioritising the time you have to yourself more than we usually do, we can optimise those precious 168 hours to the max, and notice the benefits. 

 

so, why not take that taxi or grab that ready made meal, and then enjoy putting your feet up in your mahabis slippers for that little bit longer. we all have the same number of hours in a week, so it’s up to us to use them well. 

 

 

 

  • Author avatar
    Candace Hill