• work-life balance in // brazil

 

We have delved into the work life balance in Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands. All three have systems which promote a healthier distribution, but what about countries outside of Europe?

Of the entirety of North and South America, Brazil is second only to Canada according to the Better Life Index. With only 9.5% of its residents working long hours, the Brazilians put more emphasis on leisure time in order to boost productivity during work.

In recent years, Brazil has gone through a period of rapid economic growth which has had knock on effects, such as different requirements from the workforce and changing family dynamics. They have been forced to adapt, but remain insistent on maintaining policies and initiatives which strive to achieve healthy balance.

 

mahabis guide // brazilian work life balance  

work hours

Despite the recent drastic change, many of their policies to improve the balance have been in place since 1988. Although Brazil isn't amongst the lowest when it comes to hours worked, their rules to enforce maximums are much stricter. These policies may seem unfair on businesses but the commitment to improving citizens lives is refreshing.

The upper limit on the working week is 44 hours, and the average closer to 40. The biggest benefit of these laws regards overtime; any hours worked past 44 must be paid at time and a half, on weekends or holidays it is double. This encourages businesses to ensure employees have enough time for leisure, for family and for themselves. 

 

mahabis guide // work life balance in brazil  

 paid vacation

Whilst shorter working days and weeks are important for the everyday balance, real time away from the office is key to authentic relaxation. When we are on vacation many of us tend to take a little while to snap out of the work mindset. Pushing to the back of our minds the minutiae, and resisting checking emails is often difficult.

For these reasons, Brazil's incredible 41 days holiday most certainly impacts upon the high satisfaction reported by Brazilians. The 11 federal holidays are mandated. In addition to the 30 days of vacation, this allows for real downtime. 

 

bonuses

In order to truly enjoy all of that incredible vacation time, many of us tend to feel pressure to work overtime in order to feel financially secure. In Brazil, prior to taking vacation, employees receive a bonus equating 33% of their monthly pay. 

For many, it's also common to feel the pinch around the holidays. In Brazil however, a 13th month bonus paid in December enforced by law allows all employees are free to enjoy Christmas without concern. 

 

mahabis guide // work life balance 

family time 

There's no time when family is more important than with a new child arriving to the family. The time to share and connect with a new child, and with well-wishers and extended family is not overlooked in Brazil. In 2008 maternity leave was extended from 120 to 180 days. Although the extra sixty days is optional for private companies, it is heavily adopted. 

 

sacred lunch breaks

In the UK, America and much of Europe, lunch is an unceremonious affair. The pressure to continue working can be so high that many eat at their desk or on their way to meetings. Akin to the French, don't expect it to be business as usual between 12.30 and 2.30. For Brazilians, lunch time is extremely important. A cold sandwich or a salad eaten at your desk will not suffice. Breakfast is a lighter affair and may simply be french bread and coffee, which allows people time to work up an appetite before they pour from offices with colleagues in order to chat and unwind at a churrascaria.

 

mahabis guide // work life balance 

coffee and conversation 

Coffee is not simply a form of caffeination, but a form of olive branch. It's known that a coffee can conclude the most heated of arguments. If someone offers you coffee it can be taken as an invitation to converse, to solve a dispute or to get to know someone better.

Of course, that's not the only aspect in which coffee has infiltrated Brazilian culture, but the emphasis on the accompaniment of conversation with coffee rids their people of the 'on-the-move' attitude. This allows for more pauses, more time to digest and enjoy company.

The appeal of Brazil is undeniable. If you want to read more, take a peek at curitiba here.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link


images // felipe G, martin ezequiel sanchez, caleb jones, andrew neel

work-life balance in // brazil

 

We have delved into the work life balance in Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands. All three have systems which promote a healthier distribution, but what about countries outside of Europe?

Of the entirety of North and South America, Brazil is second only to Canada according to the Better Life Index. With only 9.5% of its residents working long hours, the Brazilians put more emphasis on leisure time in order to boost productivity during work.

In recent years, Brazil has gone through a period of rapid economic growth which has had knock on effects, such as different requirements from the workforce and changing family dynamics. They have been forced to adapt, but remain insistent on maintaining policies and initiatives which strive to achieve healthy balance.

 

mahabis guide // brazilian work life balance  

work hours

Despite the recent drastic change, many of their policies to improve the balance have been in place since 1988. Although Brazil isn't amongst the lowest when it comes to hours worked, their rules to enforce maximums are much stricter. These policies may seem unfair on businesses but the commitment to improving citizens lives is refreshing.

The upper limit on the working week is 44 hours, and the average closer to 40. The biggest benefit of these laws regards overtime; any hours worked past 44 must be paid at time and a half, on weekends or holidays it is double. This encourages businesses to ensure employees have enough time for leisure, for family and for themselves. 

 

mahabis guide // work life balance in brazil  

 paid vacation

Whilst shorter working days and weeks are important for the everyday balance, real time away from the office is key to authentic relaxation. When we are on vacation many of us tend to take a little while to snap out of the work mindset. Pushing to the back of our minds the minutiae, and resisting checking emails is often difficult.

For these reasons, Brazil's incredible 41 days holiday most certainly impacts upon the high satisfaction reported by Brazilians. The 11 federal holidays are mandated. In addition to the 30 days of vacation, this allows for real downtime. 

 

bonuses

In order to truly enjoy all of that incredible vacation time, many of us tend to feel pressure to work overtime in order to feel financially secure. In Brazil, prior to taking vacation, employees receive a bonus equating 33% of their monthly pay. 

For many, it's also common to feel the pinch around the holidays. In Brazil however, a 13th month bonus paid in December enforced by law allows all employees are free to enjoy Christmas without concern. 

 

mahabis guide // work life balance 

family time 

There's no time when family is more important than with a new child arriving to the family. The time to share and connect with a new child, and with well-wishers and extended family is not overlooked in Brazil. In 2008 maternity leave was extended from 120 to 180 days. Although the extra sixty days is optional for private companies, it is heavily adopted. 

 

sacred lunch breaks

In the UK, America and much of Europe, lunch is an unceremonious affair. The pressure to continue working can be so high that many eat at their desk or on their way to meetings. Akin to the French, don't expect it to be business as usual between 12.30 and 2.30. For Brazilians, lunch time is extremely important. A cold sandwich or a salad eaten at your desk will not suffice. Breakfast is a lighter affair and may simply be french bread and coffee, which allows people time to work up an appetite before they pour from offices with colleagues in order to chat and unwind at a churrascaria.

 

mahabis guide // work life balance 

coffee and conversation 

Coffee is not simply a form of caffeination, but a form of olive branch. It's known that a coffee can conclude the most heated of arguments. If someone offers you coffee it can be taken as an invitation to converse, to solve a dispute or to get to know someone better.

Of course, that's not the only aspect in which coffee has infiltrated Brazilian culture, but the emphasis on the accompaniment of conversation with coffee rids their people of the 'on-the-move' attitude. This allows for more pauses, more time to digest and enjoy company.

The appeal of Brazil is undeniable. If you want to read more, take a peek at curitiba here.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link


images // felipe G, martin ezequiel sanchez, caleb jones, andrew neel

  • Author avatar
    Lauren Williams
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