• remote destinations // lofoten islands, norway

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: switchback travel

 

Many visitors who head to Norway aiming to reach the Arctic Circle flock to Nordkapp, so that they can brag upon returning home that they stood on the northern-most outcrop of Europe. If you’re seeking midnight sun and spectacular scenery, yet yearn for a quieter trip where you can unwind surrounded by nature, rather than tourists, head instead to the Lofoten islands.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via pixabay

 

Located right at the tip of Norway, up in the Norwegian Sea, miles above the Arctic Circle, the Lofoten Islands discourage crowds of tourists simply by their location. To get to the group of islands, you will first need to fly to Norway, then find your way up to the north via car, a connecting flight or a train. You will then have to head to the north of the islands to drive on the E10 road, which connects the five most easterly islands, and travel by ferry to reach the furthest two. When you finally arrive, admiring the tall craggy peaks of the mountains as you curve in between them, you will realise that your destination is worth the long journey.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via wikipedia

 

A winter’s visit would treat you to snow, ice and magnificent glimpses of the northern lights dancing through the sky, but we recommend visiting in summer for the best chance of experiencing good weather and to take advantage of the midnight sun. Around the summer solstice, the days are never-ending, allowing plenty of time for exploring your surroundings; hiking, kayaking or simply sitting by the side of the fjord.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via pixabay

 

One of Europe’s last remote outposts, the Lofoten Islands offer visitors the rare opportunity to get back to nature without the bombardment of modern distractions. The surprisingly mild summer climate (thanks to the Gulf Stream), allows travellers to spend all of their time enjoying the outdoors, which is, of course, why people come here. The perfect way to experience the islands is to drive between them on the interconnecting road bridges, taking it slowly and allowing time to admire the scenery. Visit the small fishing villages to get a taste of the local life, spending your nights sleeping in old fishermen’s cabins right on the water, known locally as rorbu.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via pixabay

 

Spend your days fishing in the fjord, walking up mountains to enjoy full vistas of the landscape, keeping your eyes trained on the skies to spot eagles, and hiring kayaks to explore the islands by water, discovering hidden coves. The long, quiet beaches are also ideal for surfing. Take a boat trip down the dramatic Trollfjord, or hop on a whale watching vessel from the furthest islands to spot sperm, humpback, fin and killer whales. At night, sample the local cuisine in one of many seafood restaurants, or build a fire on the beach, cook your own fish and enjoy the lingering sunset with a beer in your hand.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via wikipedia

 

The beaches here are completely unspoilt and idyllic, offering miles of white sand without any sign of another soul. It may not reach the humid temperatures of the Mediterranean, but the mercury has been known to rise to 20˚C in the summer months, and you’re highly likely to have an entire beach to yourself. Take a good book, find yourself a spot with a view of the mountains, and spend an afternoon unwinding without any interruptions.

 

remote destinations // lofoten islands, norway

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: switchback travel

 

Many visitors who head to Norway aiming to reach the Arctic Circle flock to Nordkapp, so that they can brag upon returning home that they stood on the northern-most outcrop of Europe. If you’re seeking midnight sun and spectacular scenery, yet yearn for a quieter trip where you can unwind surrounded by nature, rather than tourists, head instead to the Lofoten islands.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via pixabay

 

Located right at the tip of Norway, up in the Norwegian Sea, miles above the Arctic Circle, the Lofoten Islands discourage crowds of tourists simply by their location. To get to the group of islands, you will first need to fly to Norway, then find your way up to the north via car, a connecting flight or a train. You will then have to head to the north of the islands to drive on the E10 road, which connects the five most easterly islands, and travel by ferry to reach the furthest two. When you finally arrive, admiring the tall craggy peaks of the mountains as you curve in between them, you will realise that your destination is worth the long journey.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via wikipedia

 

A winter’s visit would treat you to snow, ice and magnificent glimpses of the northern lights dancing through the sky, but we recommend visiting in summer for the best chance of experiencing good weather and to take advantage of the midnight sun. Around the summer solstice, the days are never-ending, allowing plenty of time for exploring your surroundings; hiking, kayaking or simply sitting by the side of the fjord.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via pixabay

 

One of Europe’s last remote outposts, the Lofoten Islands offer visitors the rare opportunity to get back to nature without the bombardment of modern distractions. The surprisingly mild summer climate (thanks to the Gulf Stream), allows travellers to spend all of their time enjoying the outdoors, which is, of course, why people come here. The perfect way to experience the islands is to drive between them on the interconnecting road bridges, taking it slowly and allowing time to admire the scenery. Visit the small fishing villages to get a taste of the local life, spending your nights sleeping in old fishermen’s cabins right on the water, known locally as rorbu.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via pixabay

 

Spend your days fishing in the fjord, walking up mountains to enjoy full vistas of the landscape, keeping your eyes trained on the skies to spot eagles, and hiring kayaks to explore the islands by water, discovering hidden coves. The long, quiet beaches are also ideal for surfing. Take a boat trip down the dramatic Trollfjord, or hop on a whale watching vessel from the furthest islands to spot sperm, humpback, fin and killer whales. At night, sample the local cuisine in one of many seafood restaurants, or build a fire on the beach, cook your own fish and enjoy the lingering sunset with a beer in your hand.

 

lofoten islands // mahabis journal

 photo: via wikipedia

 

The beaches here are completely unspoilt and idyllic, offering miles of white sand without any sign of another soul. It may not reach the humid temperatures of the Mediterranean, but the mercury has been known to rise to 20˚C in the summer months, and you’re highly likely to have an entire beach to yourself. Take a good book, find yourself a spot with a view of the mountains, and spend an afternoon unwinding without any interruptions.

 

  • Emma Lavelle
Sign up here to keep updated with our latest posts