journal https://www.mahabis.com/blogs/journal living the mahabis lifestyle Mon, 17 Jul 2017 12:53:32 BST en-us make space in the city https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/top-four-city-gardens make space in the city
make space in the city
make space in the city
mahabis

make space in the city

 

Living in a city can mean constant excitement, but with the ongoing stream of business and play, sometimes we can long for an escape, whether we’re aware of it or not. City gardens can be the perfect way to make space – in the midst of the concrete jungle you can find rolling parks, wildflowers, and lakes. So why not grab a coffee or take a book and head out in search of one of these incredible city gardens…

 

make space in the city

 

Parc Buttes Chaumont // Paris

The city of love was sure to deliver a park of pure beauty, Buttes Chaumont is one of the most romantic places in the whole of Paris. Acres of rolling green, rowboats on the lake, a soft lit pergola overlooking the Sacre Couer. Head here on a sunny afternoon or evening, and find yourself forgetting you're in the famous city of lights.

 

ueno park

 

 

Ueno Park // Tokyo

When spring shows her face in Japan, the Ueno Park turns into a froth of pale pink and white as the cherry blossom blooms. More than a thousand cherry trees line the pathways of Ueno Park and walking beneath the pastel canopy you will feel like you are in a fairytale. The park is also home to Giant Pandas and the remnants of ancient shrines.

 

make space in the city


Stanley Park // Vancouver

Take a walk on the wild side at Stanley Park. Canada is world famous for its jaw dropping wilderness and this park is a prime example. Boasting over 400 acres, Stanley Park is a natural forest and during the fall months she puts on her best dress with russet tones and gold as the leaves change color. Flanked by mountains, brimming with wildlife, this is a space you can truly escape to and unwind in.

 

villa b

 

Villa Borghese // Rome

The Romans loved to play in the outdoors and Villa Borghese echoes that with its lake and temples and shaded walkways. Climb the Spanish steps in the city and you will find yourself in one of the most delightful spots in the city – stretch out on the grass beneath the pines, row out across the lake, or just take a moment to take it all in. 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready to go tweet.

 

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art. europe. explore. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/art-europe-explore art. europe. explore.

 
art. europe. explore.
mahabis

art. europe. explore.

 

Europe is famed for many cultural facets; food, architecture, music, art. Today we explore the exhibitions inspiring us for a summer of art across the continent.
 

 

London // Fahrelnissa Zeid

The kaleidoscopic wonders of Fahrelnissa Zeid are on display at the Tate Modern in London this summer. Trained in Istanbul and at Ecole de Paris, she takes influence from Arabic, Persian and Byzantine origins and overlays them with European techniques of abstract teaching. Her pieces are usually large scale and somewhat imposing, with this particular set of works focusing on bold line and bright colour.

 

 

Sofia // Lee Lozano

With a surprisingly short span of works, over just 12 years Lozano's musings thrived during times of strife. The sixties saw civil rights movements and pacifistic anti war protests, which all played a part in influencing her career as it unfolded. In this exhibition though, we see the nod towards Herbert Marcuse, whose 'Eros and Civilization' themes of play and sensuality collided with her own avid interests in sciences and mathematical accuracy.

You can see where the pivotal point occurs in this show, with fairly stark contrast between paintings focused on form and body, and those of industrialised and mechanical features.

 

 

Bilbao // Richard Serra

The Matter of Time exhibit at the Guggenheim displays the evolution of the sculptural forms in Serra's arsenal. The entire space is part of the artists experience, and beginning with simple eclipses takes the visitor through a journey of movement and shape. As you explore the space it can create a feeling of disorientation as a result of the motion.

The layout will guide you through the large scale pieces, experiencing the varying proportions and pieces of visual and experiential memory transposed by Serra.

 

 

Stockholm // Golden Sunset

This exhibition running for the rest of the year showcases a variety of works from Swedish contemporary photographers. The name of the exhibition derived from one of Julia Peirone’s portraits of teenage girls, in which each piece was named after a cocktail. Featured artists include the analogue photography of Linda Hofvander, the narrative and jarring cinematographic ideals of Tova Mozard, and Miriam Backstrom whose notable works include the transposition of visuals to tapestry, colliding old world and new.

Curated by Magnus af Petersens, it's part of the 'Before and Behind the Lens' project, examining the development of photographical experimentation through time.

 

 

Hamburg // Art & Alphabet

Another exhibition following a theme rather than a single artist, this exploration of written word in contemporary artworks is curated by Dr Brigitte Kölle. Spanning 10 years and featuring 20 artists from around the globe, Art and Alphabet investigates the role of writing as a visual language. Interesting notes upon its centralism to identity, both social and personal, are made. Typographical art forms created, analysed and utilised in unusual pieces are key to the exhibition, and are amassed at large scale for overwhelming impact.

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet

images // @lahdgallery @erinlawlorpainter @sara_bando @artipelag_art @kunsthallewien
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say no. sit back. switch off. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/say-no-sit-back-switch-off say no. sit back. switch off.
say no. sit back. switch off.
mahabis

say no. sit back. switch off.

 

Situations where friends, colleagues or acquaintances have asked you to do something you would rather not do arise commonly. Whether that is hosting book club for the 5th time in a row, letting someone stay with you when it’s a major inconvenience or committing to plans that you actually aren’t interested in - you are allowed to decline. Many find it often instigates feelings of guilt. Saying ‘no’ without feeling guilty is quite an art form. We’ve dug into why you can, why you should and how to go about it.

 

why //

The majority of people feel bad for saying no, because it inherently feels as though you are rejecting that person. It has negative associations and sometimes invites conflict. We are conditioned to go with the path of least resistance, be compliant and helpful whenever possible. This doesn’t have to go so far as to compromise your own wellbeing.

 

 

“The difference between successful people and very successful people is that very successful people say ‘no’ to almost everything.” - Warren Buffett

 

Although the definition of success is subjective, the logic behind his quote is sound regardless of how you personally quantify success. This is because saying no to obligations that don’t benefit you frees up that time. Saying no effectively and without guilt also diminishes any mental energy you would have spent on it. This is time and energy you can spend on something else. Time you can spend on you.

 

 

You could be contemplating saying no for a variety of reasons, but it usually comes down to two: setting boundaries, and managing your time effectively. The ability to do those effectively will allow you to thrive in the areas of your life which are important to you, rather than expending on obligations which leave you feeling drained, used or stretched.

 

how //

In order to avoid this there are good and bad ways to say no. The most effective ways don’t leave the door open for discussion on the matter, but remain professional and polite. We put together some of the things we find helpful to keep in mind.

  • Just say no. Much of the frustration that is placed on relationships stems from feelings of being let down. In order to temporarily escape the feeling of guilt, many say yes and change their mind once they’ve worked up to it. Often this makes the situation more difficult for the person who asked. 
  • Don’t over compensate. Unless it’s a very close friend or family member, and you feel comfortable explaining your reasoning, do not feel obligated to justify why you can’t help with their request. You have set a boundary by saying no. That should be respected.

 

 

  • Be honest. In order to do this you should examine the reasons behind why you want to decline. It’s unlikely you just ‘don’t want to’. More likely is that life has been busy, you don’t feel as though it’s the best use of your time or it inconveniences you. 
  • Be firm. Often, when not given an immediate response, people will talk themselves into a different decision. Let silence be your friend, rather than be sucked into saying “…maybe I could juggle some things around and get back to you.”

Allowing yourself to be free of all these unwanted obligations will give you the freedom and control you deserve. Feel good about your decisions, make time, and relax.

images // roman bozhko, andrew loke
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weekend escape. to morocco. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/weekend-escape-to-morocco weekend escape. to morocco.
weekend in morocco
weekend escape. to morocco.
mahabis

weekend escape. to morocco.

 

Morocco is a place that doesn’t go gentle on the senses. From the scorched Sahara Desert to the lyrical bustle of Marrakech’s marketplace, the sunbaked pink medinas under the soaring High Atlas Mountains, and the salt whipped coastal towns where life feels a little more laid back, nowhere captures a more exotic sense of place than the sprawl of Morocco. Being just a stone’s throw from the wild coast of Spain means that Morocco is great for a weekend jaunt, here’s how to get a real feel for it in a few short days…

 

weekend in morocco

 

Arrive in Marrakech

The vibrant hub of Morocco and the best place to touch down is Marrakech. The red city has long been a draw for bohemian crowds to get lost in the medina and buy leather slippers and silver teapots at the market. Be sure to book into a Riad for an authentic experience. The Riad Joya offers a cocoon of desert colors with a rooftop bar, fretwork lanterns and the warm glow of a hammam to welcome you from your walk around the lively Djemaa el-Fna.

 

Over in Essaouira

Wake early and leave the thrum of the city behind in favor of coastal charm. A three-hour bus journey and you will find yourself in the bright and breezy corner of Essaouira. Sandy ramparts, a blue and white medina, enchanted walls, and surfers riding the waves makes for a more laid-back feel to Marrakech. Pick one of the tables on the harbor front and pick fresh fish from the stand to have it cooked and served on the spot. Afterwards take a stroll along the Skala Du Port ramparts for signature sea views. Head back to Marrakech for an evening mint tea at your Riad.


morocco

 

A Day in the Desert

Don’t leave Morocco without seeing the door to the desert. Ouarzazate is the closest you will get from Marrakech to the rolling gold and saffron dunes of the Sahara. The sand blasted Kasbahs and the UNESCO surroundings have featured in many silver screen films and the film studios of the town are well worth a visit. Those dreaming of camel rides and quad adventures in the gorges and dunes can also use Ouarzazate as a base for deeper journeys.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet.

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co-working spaces around the world https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/co-working-spaces-around-the-world co-working spaces around the world
co-working spaces
co-working spaces around the world
mahabis

co-working spaces around the world

 

As more and more people are choosing to cut the ties that hold them down, the digital nomadic lifestyle is on the rise. Remote working has wonderful benefits; from sipping coffee on balconies splashed in sunlight to disappearing into the Scottish wilderness to get your reports done. Yet, working away from a shared office space can sometimes test your motivation. To keep productivity high, co-working spaces have popped up around the world. Here are some of the best working spaces for those who roam…

 

Hubud, Bali

In the yoga capital of Bali, a tropical smidge of Indonesia, you can find a beautiful bamboo space to clean up your inbox. A stone’s throw from the monkey forest, and with the best Wi-Fi signal in Ubud, this cool little spot is the place to sit in the morning sun, sip a fresh fruit smoothie, and get to work.

 hubud

 

 

Ministry of New, Mumbai

The trendiest place to write your reports can be found in a community building in Mumbai. To escape the sweltering heat, you can lose yourself in this beautifully designed oasis where green plants, vintage chandeliers, and bright Jaipur rugs set the scene.

 

co-working spaces

 

The Work Project, Hong Kong

Only recently opened, The Work Project is all about soaring ceilings, design philosophy, and a well curated library to encourage you to work. Custom art and furniture pieces adorn the light and airy space, and Patrick Blanc designed a glorious vertical garden to breathe new life into the modern city.

 

co-working spaces

 

Coco Vivo, Panama

The ideal spot for those who want to break free of the office space but still need a dose of productivity every day, Coco Vivo knows how to defy convention. Freelancers and digital nomads can spend their mornings horseback riding, swimming, and hiking before returning to water front bungalows to use the solar powered Wi-Fi and nibble fresh fruit plucked from the trees.

 

Agora Collective, Berlin

Beautiful Berlin has long been providing inspiration to artists and writers and this co-working space is a great place to network. Lashings of sun dappled space and green foliage to create a calm work environment, but also lots of inspiring things going on such as exhibitions, film showings, and workshops.

 

co-working

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready to go tweet.

 

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the best four places to relax https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/best-four-places-for-relax the best four places to relax
zen retreats
the best four places to relax
mahabis

the best four places to relax

 

Inner peace can be difficult to pin down sometimes, and in those moments, it makes sense to turn your gaze to the wider edges of the world. A sense of outer calm can grind inner calamity to a halt, which is why putting yourself in the way of quiet beauty will always help to bring out a softer clearer side. Take a look at our top four truly inspiring zen places across our planet…

 

Mount Kailash, Tibet

People say that Mount Kailash is the greatest mystical library in the world and for over ten thousand years, pilgrims have been making the journey to the holy mountain. The throne of Shiva, the place of pure nirvana and the home of the Chakra Samvara – these are just some of the reasons people believe Kailash to be the ultimate journey. Spiritualism aside, the rising shadow of the mountain, the snowy peaks and the sacred crystal-clear waters of Lake Manasarovar will cleanse you inside and out.

 zen places

 

Lake Atitlan Guatemala

The ancient waters of Lake Atitlan have long drawn crowds of hippies all seeking a sip of that Mayan magic. Mountains, volcanoes and a haze of wildflowers form a ring of fire around the dazzling lake. Steer clear of the larger towns and instead hike to somewhere like San Marcos La Laguna to find the wild communities who will balance your chakras for you.

 

lake

 

Mahabodhi Temple, India

Even if Buddhas and tourists flock the world over to come and gaze at the branches from which the Buddha reached enlightenment, even standing beside its boughs will fill you with calm. The Mahabodhi Temple in Bihar is one of the most sacred places in the world for Zen seekers. The soaring tower, the breath of incense and the sound of chanting add layers upon layers of calm, and the tree itself is grand in size and truly awe inspiring.

 

india

 

Halibut Cove, Alaska

A tiny beautiful community dwarfed by the splendor of the icy wilderness – Halibut Cove is sure to make you feel alive and completely present. Humpback whales fan their tails in the blue waters, birds soar overhead, and the trees are the deepest shade of evergreen. As the island is only accessible by boat or plane, you can be sure of total bliss and serenity during your stay.

 

halibut

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

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how to celebrate midsummer the scandinavian way https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/how-to-celebrate-midsummer-the-scandinavian-way how to celebrate midsummer the scandinavian way
scandinavian midsummer
how to celebrate midsummer the scandinavian way
mahabis

how to celebrate midsummer the scandinavian way


It is said that a midsummers eve should start with flowers and end in fire.  After endless days of winter darkness, Scandinavians are more than glad to welcome the midnight sun that barely dips its head beneath the horizon before rising again. White nights are a time of softness and celebration, of relaxing long into the evenings. We take a look at how some Scandinavian countries choose to celebrate.


norway //

On June 21st Norwegians are the first to shrug off their winter inhibitions to make way for a festival of summer that welcomes magic and mayhem. On the eve of St Hans, Norwegians gather along the South Coast, to the pretty seaside villages for street parties, pancakes and wild strawberries in the harbor and to dress their wooden boats with flowers and branches of birch. Fires blaze well into the night and everyone soaks up the splendour of festivity past the strike of midnight.

 

scandinavian midsummer

 


iceland //

Hiking a volcano any time of day is an amazing experience, but hiking in the golden halo of night is something else. Icelanders sometimes choose to take a pilgrimage to climb the Hengill volcano. Step across scorched lava fields, ancient craters, and lush valleys until you reach the steamy hot springs of Reykjadalur. Sink down into the warm volcanic waters to refresh before hiking back down the slopes.


finland //

To celebrate the endless soiree of white nights in Finland, it seems that everybody rents a cottage in the forest. The midnight sun streaming through shadowy branches turns the world into an incredible place. Locals will often sit out on their porch well into the small hours or even take a boat out across the lake regardless of the stars prickling the hazy soft sky.

scandinavian midsummer

 

sweden //

While Norwegians are busy tackling blazes and blooms, down in Sweden they celebrate the White Nights with a little less Viking magic. The capital celebrates the red gold sky all night by having their open-air museum Skansen stay open late, by having al fresco dining scattered across the pavements until well past bedtime, and by having folk dancing around the Maypole on midsummers eve.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet.

 

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dads. on downtime. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/dads-on-downtime dads. on downtime.
dads. on downtime.
dads. on downtime.
mahabis

dads. on downtime.

 

We chat with some of our mahabis dads about their lifestyles, and how they like to relax. Between doing the school run and getting the kids into bed, it can be a challenge to find time to slip into your mahabis and put your feet up every once in a while. Read on to see how Jamie Day and Craig Howell manage...

 

Talk us through a typical day in your life...

"Before kids, I thought the day started around 8am. These day, by 8am I’ll be at work having already got the kids up, fed them and done the school run – how times have changed huh? A flurry of emails and some meetings later, and I find myself doing it all in reverse; getting the kids home, fed, bathed and into bed. Then, there’s a few hours to relax with my wife before doing it all again." - jamie

"I have a job than involves a lot of travel Monday-Friday but with that comes the flexibility. On the days when I am not at client meetings I work from home, therefore I have the opportunity to do the school run and spend time with Jonnie after school. If required I finish off any work once he has gone to bed." - craig

 

craig howellCraig's choice of mahabis: sala stone summer edition x ilen ivory sole.

 

How do you balance children and downtime?

"As a hands-on father, there really isn’t much of a balance. Life goes at 100mph, but to ensure I’m not driven mad by the endless dried out colouring pens (put those lids back on kids!) or half eaten apples, any downtime I do get is spent doing the things I enjoy." - jamie 

"I know it sounds corny, but ultimately I see spending time with Jonnie and Donna as “downtime”. As I have a demanding job, at weekends it’s great to just slow down and relax at home or with friends" - craig

 

jamie dayJamie's choice of mahabis: larvik light grey x ilen ivory sole

 

How important is downtime to you, and how do you like to switch off?

"I think any modern-day dad will tell you they need some downtime to recuperate and be in a state to do it all again - even if it’s just for a few moments. When I have some time to myself, I like to spend it with my wife, or walking the dogs, or tapping away at my laptop with a bit of creative writing (before the kids come along and probably lose all my unsaved work!)" - jamie

"It’s extremely important as I think we all need a little “me” time to maintain a happy, healthy family environment. In my (limited) spare time I produce music and this is a great way for relaxing for me and allows my creative juices to flow." - craig

 

Why not check out Jamie's blog here and Craig's soundcloud here.

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mahabis interviews // eddie garcia https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/eddie-garcia-interview mahabis interviews // eddie garcia
eddie garcia
mahabis interviews // eddie garcia
mahabis

mahabis interviews // eddie garcia

 

We chat to content creator Eddie Garcia, about his lifestyle as a photographer split between Geneva, Miami and London, and where he finds his creative inspiration. Check out Eddie's work here, and read on to find out more about he likes to unwind...

 

Before we begin, describe what you do in one sentence.

I’m a product designer turned photographer.

It’s actually a lot more complicated than that, because I don't just do (or photograph) one thing. I was always told to be careful not to become a jack of all trades and master of none. I've obviously gone against that and do a multitude of things to satisfy my creative needs. Photography has always been at the centre of it all though. 

 

Talk us through a typical day in your life.

There’s no such thing as a typical day for me, but most of them include a lot of coffee, walking my dog, and taking about 2300 photos (seriously) - 95% of them end up on the cutting room floor. 

 

 eddie

 

How do you manage to make time to relax? How important is downtime to you?

Every morning I give myself one hour to enjoy my coffee, it’s an hour I get to not think or worry about anything. It’s extremely important, I wouldn’t be able to function otherwise.

 

How would you describe the ultimate way you’d choose to relax and unwind from a busy day…

I wish I could just go to a chalet in the Swiss Alps with a view of the snowy mountains every day. There’s nothing I find more relaxing than that.   

 

eddie garcia 

 

Which is your favourite place out of London, Geneva and Miami? Why?

This is impossible for me to answer. Miami is where some of my closest friends are, Geneva is where my family is (which means I get fed and spoiled every time I go) and London is simply home… for now anyway! 


If experiencing a creative block, how do you recharge your creativity?

Travelling helps, I find that new cities are always the most inspiring. I usually get bursts of creativity when I see something I'm accustomed to done in a different way.

 

Three random picks from your bookshelf/ music collection. Go.

Adele and Ben Howard’s entire discography all day every day - Currently reading ‘TED Talks: The official TED guide to public speaking’ (putting my wishes out in the universe)


If you had an extra hour in the day, how would you spend it?

Probably planning how I can best used the other 24 hours in day - Or daydreaming, that’s more realistic.

 

eddie garcia 

 

Check out Eddie's photography here.

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how procrastination can change your life for the better https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/how-procrastination-can-change-your-life-for-the-better how procrastination can change your life for the better
procrastination
how procrastination can change your life for the better
mahabis

how procrastination can change your life for the better

 

“Because if you don't know how to manage time, time can rule you like a tyrant.” ― Frank Partnoy, Wait: The Useful Art of Procrastination

 

Every day we make 35000 decisions, some refer to the colour of our socks, others to investing heavily in the stock market, some to just bagel toppings. Decisions are a major part of our life, but they also cause a ripple effect that reaches out to touch others. Experts like Frank Partnoy argue that procrastination helps us to make better, well thought out, and more informed decisions in life.

In the modern world we abhor procrastination, if we catch ourselves doing it, we are quick to call ourselves to task to make up for that lingering time. But Greeks and Romans adored procrastination, the great thinkers and philosophers of the time would often be found sitting gazing into space. This all ground to a halt during the puritanical times, when suddenly the mantra of ‘idle hands and devil’s plaything’ became a common uttered phrase.

 

procrastination

 

Type procrastination into your search engine and there are a million articles and life hacks telling you exactly how to stop it. Psychology Today infers that it reflects our perennial struggle with self-control. Yet, Partnoy tells us a different tale, that procrastination can and should be practiced well. This isn’t an excuse to kick back on the couch all day every day, but rather to practice not making snap decisions or judgements.

When faced with a decision, rather than jump in with a jerk reaction, it may be best to ask yourself two questions. Rather than going straight to the ‘what should I do’ part of the situation, Partnoy suggests asking first ‘how much time do I have to make this decision’. Decision making should be at least a two-step process.

 

procrastination

 

When you don’t respond to the worlds questions straightaway you make your own life easier. Rather than committing to things you don’t want to do, wondering if you made the right choice, or dwelling on the answer you gave, you push all that away. You may think you would spend that excess time going back and forth on the decision, but you should do other things instead. Next time you need to decide something – take a breath, walk, read a book, and slowly you will process the answer. Chances are it will be a much more honest answer than it would if you had leaped into a decision. This, is the art of procrastination.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

photos via unsplash
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bobby burrage, on dad-time and downtime https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/bobby-burrage-on-downtime bobby burrage, on dad-time and downtime
bobby burrage
bobby burrage, on dad-time and downtime
mahabis

bobby burrage, on dad-time and downtime

 

We chat with Bobby Burrage, Creative Director of The Click Design Consultants, a branding consultancy and co-Creative Director of Nor–Folk. Father to Stanley, aged four, and husband to Fiona Burrage, we find out how Bobby makes time for both dad-time and downtime.

 

dads on downtime

Bobby's choice of mahabis: larvik dark grey x skien black

"A typical work day would involve Stanley waking between 6-7am. Every once in a while he wakes around 4am and I usually get in his bed for a cuddle and he goes straight back to sleep. We have breakfast, at the moment, that tends to be on the roof terrace as the weather has been so good. We get dressed and are ready to start the day. We drop Stanley at nursery and head into the studio, where I work with my wife, Fiona.

Twice a week I make time to go to PT sessions in the middle of the day and my working days are usually a mix of client projects and meetings. Fiona is usually in charge of the playlist, despite my best efforts to have some say in what she plays! Despite sitting opposite each other, we are very focussed when we work so when we’re in the studio together, we try to make sure we at least pop out for a coffee together (and that we don’t discuss work).

 

dads on downtime

Fiona's choice of mahabis: larvik light grey

Around 5-6pm, we collect Stanley from his grandparents and bring him home. The next couple hours are Stanley time. This could be making sandcastles in his sandpit, going for a bike ride or watching the trains at the station. We share bath-time and books at bedtime. It’s my favourite time of the day. He’s asleep around 8pm. More nights that I’d like it to be the case, I then work when Stanley is in bed, we both do.

We always watch a box-set episode before we go to bed, no matter how late it is. We’re currently watching the latest season of House of Cards, just finished Line of Duty. With Fiona being active on social media, we tend to combine some work photos at the weekends but generally, it’s about family time.

It is hard to balance work and play but I’m better at switching off than Fiona. We do make sure when we are with Stanley we limit ‘working.’ We like to enjoy the simple pleasures at the weekend like a walk in the woods accompanied by Stanley’s diggers, or a trip to the beach with his dinosaurs.

 dads. on downtime.

Stanley's choice of mahabis: larvik light grey x borgen blue

 

For me, football with my friends and regular short breaks are so important. We work hard, so it’s really important that we do get a chance to get away together just us. In under a month, we are going to the Algarve and a month later to the Isle of Wight with my parents.

 

We’ve learnt you mustn’t put off the things you really want to do, you just have to make it happen. Work Hard, Play Hard!

 

 

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make time for downtime https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/make-time-for-downtime make time for downtime
make time for downtime
make time for downtime
mahabis

make time for downtime

 

Most of us can relate to bragging about how busy we are, or comparing notes with friends regarding how little sleep we get, we reel off endless lists of all the things we must get done. As we roll our eyes It seems like we are complaining, but somewhere deep down, there is also a smattering of smugness. As a modern-day culture, we tend to be obsessed with busyness and those who have the most to do, are the ones we hold in the highest regard. 

The Harvard Business Review conducted a study to see if people perceived busy individuals as having higher status over those who took time out. The results fell in favour of those with barely enough time to peel an orange – they were regarded as the tour de force of success. 

 

make time for downtime

 

Yet, surely the true success should lie with those who can efficiently manage their time? Heather Greenwood Davis, a travel blogger who cut ties with the busy office life to reconnect with herself, reminds us all to ‘Be greedy about your time. Take it back from the people or things that would threaten to squander it.’ It’s important to note that the person squandering most of your time could be yourself.

Everything in our modern world is geared towards achievement – from fighting for Instagram likes to apps and life hacks that promise to be timesavers. Yet, even if we were to be granted that precious extra time what would we do with it? Spend it researching online for even more lifehacks, apps, and ways to fill that time we have managed to mine?

Brene Brown author of Daring Greatly believes that we use being busy as our armour against the world and to protect ourselves from being forced to stop a second and reflect. Rather than confront our sensibilities we can just stay busy, reshuffle the papers, and push those thoughts to the bottom of the to do pile.

 

make time for downtime

 

Downtime, real honest and authentic downtime away from the constant blinkering of our screens is important for our mental health. Not only does it give us time to process our thoughts and feelings, but it also helps us to tap into our inner creativity and imagination. You can’t just crash into downtime, so here are a couple of ways in which you can naturally start reintroducing it to your everyday life.

- Set up an internet timer that cuts off your online use after 6pm. Instead of endless trawling you can take time to cook or pick up a good book.

- Don’t use headphones to listen to podcasts or music when walking, rather than distracting yourself – allow time and space for your own thoughts.

- Stop multitasking, no- one is a superhuman.

 

Start your downtime today, with mahabis slippers. 

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet. 

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reinventing luxury // joe cooke, lead designer https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/reinventing-luxury-joe-cooke-lead-designer reinventing luxury // joe cooke, lead designer
the mahabis luxe
reinventing luxury // joe cooke, lead designer
mahabis

reinventing luxury // joe cooke, lead designer

 

From the sheepwool lining of the mahabis classic, to the lightweight breathable mesh that forms the summer edition, we thought we'd share the inspiration behind the creation of the mahabis luxe. We chat to lead designer Joe Cooke about how he designed the luxe, and how it differs from our timeless classic and summer designs. 

"The luxe was very much a natural but considered extension of the range. We felt like we had captured that feeling of downtime with the classic and summer slippers and hoped to elevate that experience with the creation of the mahabis luxe.

 

mahabis luxe

 

We maintained the crucial design features of the classic and summer slippers that make them distinctively mahabis: the collapsible neoprene heel, the silhouette and the detachable sole. But for the luxe, the upper is made from a single piece of a premium ultra-soft leather that we selected from Europe, near our factory in Portugal. For us, leather encapsulated that feeling of ultimate, timeless, quality. There are such a broad range of varying leathers, but we chose one that gave us the understated aesthetic that we desired from a distance, whilst maintaining a soft, detailed surface texture when held. We kept the 100% wool lining of the classic to bring equal comfort, soft-touch and warmth to the luxe.

 the luxe

  

We had a great product in the classic and summer, and they were being treasured and appreciated globally. As a result, we only tackled elements of the original design that were necessary to create a 'luxe' slipper. Whilst keeping the manufacturing process the same, the leather behaves in a very different way to the felt and mesh that we selected for the classic and summer. However, as this was an extension of the range, it was important to make sure the luxe joined the modular range so that it could also be worn with soles from the classic and summer. It’s fulfilling to see some customers own the entire range!

 

We kept the aesthetic refined and carefully considered two timeless colours with equivalent soles. To enable these mahabis to be the ultimate investment in switching off, we selected colours that conformed seamlessly to the environments in which mahabis were being worn. However, we also considered a range of beautiful variations that may be arriving in the future…stay tuned.

 

Check out the mahabis luxe here.

the mahabis luxe

 

Keep an eye on social media for our upcoming product developments, and share this post with our ready-to-go tweet.

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top four camping spots https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/top-four-camping-locations top four camping spots
camping
top four camping spots
mahabis

top four camping spots

 


“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness.” - John Muir

 

The thought of summer nights make us gaze longingly at the world outside our window, so we though we'd get ahead and find some ideas of where to head next time camping is on the agenda. We think these wild camping spots across Europe are definitely worth seeking out on your next adventure.

 

camping


1. Provence, South of France // 

With its rolling lavender fields and exquisite cheeses, Provence is an idyllic haven for those who seek to slow life down a pace or two. France has long been camper friendly and wild camping along the Camargue is perfectly legal. The stretch from Saintes Maries-de-la-Mer and the Rhone River Delta boast sandy windswept deserts and bright blue waters dotted with the sails of kite surfers.

 

2. The Priests Hole Cave, England // 

The lore of the Lake District lures outdoor adventurers seeking endless hikes through patchwork hills. One of the best wild camping spots can be found carved into the rock up on Doves Crag. Scramble up the rocks and you will find Priests Hole. For a night or two you can huddle in this natural cavity, watching the stars glaze the sky and munching on your breakfast to exceptional panoramic views of the surrounding countryside and numerous shimmering lakes.

 

camping

 

3. Lofoten Islands, Norway // 

Northern Norway loses its milky moonlight in the summer, making way for a golden halo that lasts around the clock as part of her white nights. On the Lofoten Islands wild camping is considered a right and not a privilege up in the depths of the Arctic Circle. Sleep on the remote beaches of Horseid or scramble the iced white peaks powering above Bunes Beach to wake up with panoramic views of pure unfettered nature.

4. Lahemaa National Park, Estonia //

The northern coast of Estonia is a vision of stony shores, deep blue waters, and sweet pine forests. The so-called land of bays is perfect for wild camping, with mostly flat lands stretching through the hazy hinterland. The protected forest brims with foxes, brown bears and wild boars and you can set up your tent wherever the whim takes you.
 
camping

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it with our ready to go tweet.

 

Miss home comforts whilst you're camping? mahabis are so light and comfortable they're easily tucked away in a backpack.Check them out here...
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mahabis stories // discovering skåne https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-stories-discovering-skane mahabis stories // discovering skåne
discovering skane
mahabis stories // discovering skåne
mahabis

mahabis stories // discovering skåne

 

Continuing our journey through our namesakes, we migrate to Skåne County. Known in English as Skania, it is the southernmost county in Sweden. As it borders Denmark there has been contention about incorporating it as 'Greater Copenhagen'. This was proposed back in 2015 and swiftly rebuked by Sweden. They retained the ownership of the beautiful county headed by Malmo, the third city of Sweden.

 

city lights //

The city of Malmo is the largest in the county and known for its wealth of green spaces, and glittering social scene. Reportedly the city has the most bars and restaurants per capita of anywhere in Sweden, and when visiting you can feel the atmosphere buzzing around you. The affectionately named Mollen (short for Möllevångstorget) is one of the large piazzas to hold a farmers market, whereas Lilla Torg is the one to visit for a delicious traditional lunch or dinner. Featuring innovative architecture, a beach within stumbling distance, and open air baths, the destination is certainly a top pick for city-lovers.

discovering skane

 

rural adventures //

The largest rural attraction in the area is certainly the Skåneleden Trail. From the dramatic coastal walks to the remote wilderness in the North East, there's something for everyone. The trail is dotted with monuments such as the Kollen lighthouse, stunning lakes, and peaceful meadows. For the ornithologists amongst us, you may catch glimpses of rare birds, whereas botanists should keep an eye toward the ground for the local flora and fauna.

 

food and drink //

Skåne is lucky enough to have a temperate climate for growth, meaning that much of the produce you taste will be locally sourced. Ample fruit and veg feature in farm shops across the region, but more interestingly the beverage industry is booming. Orchards, vineyards, and breweries feature prominently and to miss out on the fresh juices, mouth-watering musts, sensational spirits, well-balanced wines and bold-tasting beers would be unfathomable. Not only is the local produce incredibly fresh and tasty, but the culinary culture across Scandinavia is currently undergoing somewhat of a revolution. Sample gastronomic delights in some of the region's best restaurants such as Michelin acclaimed Daniel Berlin or rough and ready Far I Hatten.

 

history //

Whether you prefer museums, stone circles or architecture, Skåne has something to delight every history buff. Rich with Viking heritage the region has seen it's fair share of bloodshed. See a live (but less gory) re-enactment at Foteviken, an open-air reconstruction of a Viking settlement perfect for fans of medieval history. For those with a more mystical interest, the Ales Stones are the Stonehenge of Sweden. Dating back to the Iron Age, and much like Stonehenge, the Ales Stones are a mystery yet to be unraveled. One thing is for certain, its location atop the cliffs of the fishing village of Kåseberga provide a phenomenal view across the Baltic Sea. 

check out our skåne yellow mahabis here.

 

images // andrej chudy, jorchr, christina munteanu
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stop rushing. start wasting time. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/living-life-at-a-slower-pace stop rushing. start wasting time.
the benefits of living at a slower pace
stop rushing. start wasting time.
mahabis

stop rushing. start wasting time.

 

From the second we open our eyes to the moment we go to sleep – it’s easy to get swept down the rapid-fire river of 21st century life. We live in a world deliriously on the go; we climb career ladders, we stomp across the globe, we're constantly setting ourselves incredibly high tasks. A fast-paced life can be exhilarating and rewarding – but a slow relaxed pace can give you time to breathe and balance your world beautifully. Take a look at the benefits of a life well balanced.

 

life on the go

 

For those in favor of a life geared towards the fast lane it can be argued that a more hectic pace leads to lavish opportunities for self-development. We are fortunate enough to live in a world of vast possibility; from learning French to running marathons, the more you take on, the more you can achieve. 

When you are spending your days rushing from A to B it leaves less time to dwell. Mindful thinking can lead to a healthy and fulfilled life, yet if you are a person who tends to dwell on negative thinking or struggles with anxiety – then a life brimming with variety and change can sometimes seem the perfect distraction. 

 

the benefits of living at a slower place

 

However, studies conducted on the happiness stakes of countries across the world showcase that places like Denmark are off the charts when it comes to contentment levels. The Danes tend to live their life a little slower -they work less hours or they work from home, they relish more time in the great outdoors, and they have great childcare and social facilities.  

Embracing the day in a gentler way and taking a pause to think about how you spend your time can lead to deeper decisions. On the go life can lead to getting more done, but arguably you can end up wasting time doing things that aren’t that important to you. Waking half an hour earlier to spend some time relaxing and preparing mindfully about how you want to commit the hours of your day can deliver a more intuitive perspective as to what’s important to you, and ultimately help made your day more productive.

So, why not slip on your mahabis, sit back and make some time to do nothing. 
 

the benefits of living slower

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet.

 

 

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mahabis stories // designers. bloggers. photographers. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mums-worldwide mahabis stories // designers. bloggers. photographers.
mahabis mums
mahabis stories // designers. bloggers. photographers.
mahabis

mahabis stories // designers. bloggers. photographers.

 

In light of upcoming Mother's Day in many countries, we thought we'd take a look at some of our mahabis mums, and how they like spending their downtime.

Interestingly, Mother's Day is celebrated at different times in different parts of the world. The UK celebrates Mothering Sunday but uses the terms interchangeably. This is on the 4th Sunday of Lent, and dates back to a time when servants were given the day off to return to their 'mothering' church.


The most commonly celebrated is the US holiday. It began with one woman in Grafton, West Virginia, who campaigned heartily for it to become officially recognised in memoriam of her own mother. It was signed off in 1911 as an official US Celebration of Mothers. This same date is recognised in Australia, NZ, Japan, and many countries in Europe and Africa. 


 


// amelia jones

 

Based in Utah but an avid traveller, Amelia (Emmy) can be found inspiring instagram with beautiful pics of her gorgeous family and home. 

 

  

 

// jenna robert

 

Born and raised in Arizona, Jenna is a freelance graphic designer who interned with Marta Stewart. She now lives in the Utah mountains with her son, Ralph and husband, Dustin. 

 

 

 

 

 


// melanie barnes

 

Melanie is a UK lifestyle blogger who focuses on motherhood, slow living, well-being, creativity, yoga and mindfulness. Currently renovating and documenting the process, she encourages her daughter to pick up the camera too. 

 

 

 

// deborah gordon

 

Glasgow based lifestyle blogger and purveyor of minimalist photography, Deborah created her brand Ollie and Seb based around her two little boys.

 

 

 

 

// jenna ogle

 

New York based Jenna is a wife, blogger and mum of four girls. Olivia, Giuliana, Lidia and Evelyn keep her busy alongside her work running Home & The Homemaker. 




 

 

// amanda jane jones

Founder of @definemagazine, Amanda is a graphic designer from Chicago. The BYU grad and mummy to Jane and Miles was also a founding designer of Kinfolk Magazine.

 

Share your mahabis moments with #mahabis...

 

 

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mahabis interviews // marie dahlstrøm https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-interviews-marie-dahlstrom mahabis interviews // marie dahlstrøm
mahabis interviews
mahabis interviews // marie dahlstrøm
mahabis

mahabis interviews // marie dahlstrøm

 

marie dahlstrom

 

We catch up with Danish singer-songwriter, Marie Dahlstrøm. From performing on stage, to recording at her home in London, we find out what it is that makes Marie feel relaxed and comfortable. Influenced by her experiences in both Copenhagen and London, Marie's music is a mixture of singer songwriter style, and soulful R&B sound. Read on to find out how, in between all the recording and performing, Marie finds her own way to switch off, and unwind.

Check out the video below to hear more from Marie herself...

 

 

 

When did your interest in music begin?

I first started doing music when I was in singing in the choir at primary school. I hadn't really planned to release music, I just started putting it out there and then thought this is actually quite fun, I’m gonna do it some more! It was just natural for me to just make more music, not really thinking about it in a strategic way, and I like that about it. Figuring out the industry by myself, how to release songs and how to work out the software has all been a nice, natural process.

 marie dahlstrom

 

Describe a typical day...

I try to wake up early. It doesn't always work out this way, but I try to wake up around 7am. The first thing I always do is make some coffee! The evening is better for recording emotional stuff, for example, I'm much better at singing in the evening. When it's dark I find it easier get into the zone, and generally perform better.

 

marie dahlstrøm

 

How do you find the difference between recording and performing?

Recording at home is really great, as you're in an environment that you're used to. You're used to your own instrument, to your computer, to your own set-up... you just feel like you’re in your own space. Performing on stage is completely different to making music at home and being in your creative zone.

 

When you’re on stage you always have to be switched on. There has to be some kind of moment when you can just stop, and switch it all off.

 

How do you like to switch off after a busy day?

If I’ve been out all day I just like silence. I like to just go into a room, close the door, and just be quiet. To just sit and not really do much, just zone out. When you work with music all the time, being quiet means a lot. So for me, having a break from music is really good. Time to reset your ears, reset your creativity, and just, zone out a little bit.

 marie dahlstrom

marie's choice of mahabis: larvik light grey x rjukan red

 

Is finding a work-life balance when working at home difficult?

I guess everyone's different, it's about finding out how you work best. It's often difficult when you work at home, as the boundaries are blurred. For example, when I go to bed I look at my keyboard and when I wake up the keyboard looks at me! It takes time to find that balance.


If you had an extra hour in the day, how would you spend it?

If I had an extra hour during my day, I’d definitely spend it on practicing.

 marie dahlstrom

 

Check out some of Marie's music here...

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet.

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mahabis stories // discovering skien https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-stories-discovering-skien mahabis stories // discovering skien
skien, norway
mahabis stories // discovering skien
mahabis

mahabis stories // discovering skien

 

The namesake of our classic black is one of Norway's oldest cities. With town history as far back as the middle ages, it was declared a market town in 1358. It used to be Norway's primary port town, and as the norse derives from 'Skiða' which means 'straight plank' many believe it was named after a particularly straight brook or river.

 



Most of its interest today comes from tourists visiting the Telemark Canal. The town is the perfect starting point for an outdoorsy trip in the area. Above the town is the 'Brekkeparken', a park landscaped in a traditionally English style. Touted for blending the urban of the town and the nature surrounding it, it contains waterscapes and floral decorations to creating a delicately beautiful background to Skien. The Fylke museum is also contained within the park and gives an extra cultural depth to any visit. Also in the vein of culture, Skien is the birthplace of famed Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Settings in his notorious dramas are usually nods to olden Skien. Currently the Ibsenhuset houses the culture within the city, including music, artists, theatre and opera. The home to the area's symphony orchestra, Grenland Symfoniorkester and a local culture school.

 



Although not in a region particularly known for its architecture, Skien has an impressive church, featuring stunning stained glass, local glazed stone and one of the largest organs in Norway. The tourist attraction has tours in summer and is well worth a visit.


If at any point you feel the need to escape the city, the area of Børsesjø is close by. A protected nature reserve with hundreds varieties of birds for the undercover ornithologists amongst you, and a plethora of fish for anybody who has an interest in bream, roach or eel.


A path will lead you from Gjerpen church to Børsesjø. Indicated simply as a route to a "Fugletårnet" or bird watching tower, actually lies the path to stunning views and rural peace and quiet. 

 

On the opposite end of the spectrum you can visit during June for Porsgrunn International Theatre Festival. The week-long festival features indoor and outdoor theatres, and 'The Street of Fools' the festival cafe, Kafe K, and concerts. For the foodies, the area around "Langbryggene" has the highest density of eating and drinking establishments. Look for some traditional norwegian food to tickle your tastebuds. There's no specific standouts in Skien, but dishes include reindeer, sour cream pudding and waffles.

 

images // phil, phillip, nico

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reinventing the kids slipper // joe cooke, lead designer https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/reinventing-the-kids-slipper-joe-cooke reinventing the kids slipper // joe cooke, lead designer
kids slippers
reinventing the kids slipper // joe cooke, lead designer
mahabis

reinventing the kids slipper // joe cooke, lead designer

 

We catch up with our lead designer, Joe Cooke, about his inspiration when designing mahabis, and more recently, the mahabis kids range. Read on to find out how comfort and the importance of downtime have led to the creation of our timeless mahabis slipper.

 

"mahabis are created to help to give you space, a place for downtime, free from distractions and we wanted to facilitate this by just removing anything else that is unnecessary. How the products visually look is a crucial part in achieving that. Minimalism, simplicity and functionality are the central principles and they have definitely had an impact in forming the minimal, timeless design of our products and the overall aesthetic."

 mahabis kids

 

"From day one, we'd designed mahabis as unisex slippers, to allow the mahabis experience to be enjoyed regardless of demographic. Hence, we followed the same rationale when creating mahabis kids. It’s an experience to be shared and therefore, there is no-one more important to share the feeling of home with than your kids. For this product, we wanted to combine the protection of home with the freedom of play, whilst remaining an extension of the mahabis classic and summer slippers.

 

reinventing the kids slipper 

 

The design maintains the key features of the adults range to translate the quality to that of kids, therefore the materials and aesthetic are the same. But for kids mahabis, the sole is fixed. We know the difficulty sometimes in getting kids to coordinate! So we just wanted to make the mahabis kids effortless and instinctive for them to use.

 

Comfort was the most influential consideration whilst creating mahabis kids. When we feel comfortable, we feel the protection and freedom that liberates us, but keeps us secure at the same time. More importantly, when our kids feel comfortable, we do. So, we maintained many signature features of our adult slipper, but also focused intently on the delicate fitting that is unique to a child's foot. It had to be simple to put on; to not hinder the excitement to play, and to not obstruct the freedom during use.

 

redesigning the slipper

As a result, we made many small tweaks to the fit of the kids slippers. We’re building timeless products to be treasured and that has been in the forefront of our mind whilst designing and creating them. Sometimes we questioned whether the minutiae would make a noticeable difference, but we knew that by improving seemingly small aspects, we could turn a mundane experience into a treasured one. On one occasion during the design process, we gave a prototype to a 4 year old girl to test, and when we saw the joy on her face, we knew it was right." 

 

Check out the mahabis kids slipper here

 

mahabis kids

 

Keep an eye on social media to find out more about upcoming product developments, and share this post with a ready-to-go tweet.

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the importance of enclothed cognition https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/the-importance-of-enclothed-cognition the importance of enclothed cognition
enclothed cognition
the importance of enclothed cognition
mahabis

the importance of enclothed cognition

 

In the thrum of our modern world we have become accustomed to different dress for different modes. At home, we slip out of our work clothes and into soft slippers and cozy clothes. Even the very act of taking a watch off your wrist can cause an immediate shift in relaxation.

 

enclothed cognition

 

Yet when it comes to our working life we turn to stiff shoes and polished collars in the belief it boosts our productivity. Recent studies are starting to change the game. More than one study has shown that primary school students who swapped shoes for slippers in the classroom became more engaged in learning.

Wearing slippers while working can have the same effect for many. When you kick off your shoes and slip into something more comfortable you feel less tense and under pressure, and thus you can relax and let the knowledge sink in or allow yourself to follow the tangents of creative thought patterns. Adults may feel less inclined to turn to slippers in the workplace, but for children -the cognitive results are truly illuminating.

 

enclothed cognition

 

 

From the Classroom…

 

In a young environment, there can be a raucous amount of energy, children love to stomp and run and shout. Yet the studies found that when shoes were replaced with slippers, the atmosphere became softer, the children calmer and more attentive- making for fewer disruptions. The research also found that bullying behavior was reduced as children leaned towards a gentler approach to each other. They were also more relaxed in their environment, willing to stretch out on the floor with a book and fall into quiet time with ease and pleasure.

 

enclothed cognition

 

 

To the Office…

 

In Sweden companies are also turning towards the same casual dress policy – especially as smart office wear is declining in favor of comfy cottons and softer footwear. It seems that taking a more barefoot approach to workwear or at least swapping for slippers leads to more mindfulness at work and reduces the impact of stress. The trend is spreading, not only from the classroom but the office space too; leave your shoes at the door and watch the world sink into a more relaxed state of learning.

 

 the importance of enclothed cognition

 

To help you get into a relaxed state of mind, why not check out our slippers and lifestyle accessories.

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet.

 

 

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bank holiday. feet up. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/bank-holiday-feet-up bank holiday. feet up.
bank holiday
bank holiday. feet up.
mahabis

bank holiday. feet up.

 

With the bank holiday coming up, we thought we'd look at how some of our mahabis wearers choose to put their feet up and enjoy their downtime. 

 

feet up together //

 

feet up

photo: @livingnotes

check out our larvik light grey slippers here.

 

feet up in morocco //

bank holiday. feet up.

photo: @fauszimausi

check out our nora navy x ilen ivory summer slipper here.

 

feet up indoors // 

relaxationphoto: @jacobaustinrank

check out our classic light grey x ilen ivory here.

 

feet up with the pets // 

mahabis downtime
 photo: @loyalcanineco

check out our larvik dark grey slipper here.

 

feet up and read //

mahabis downtime

photo: @eddiegrc

check out our larvik light grey x larvik grey slipper here

 

 

feet up and get creative // 

bank holiday feet up

photo: @merysaporito

check out our larvik light grey x borgen blue slipper here.

 

Let us know how you're spending your weekend via our ready-to-go tweet.

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the history of the slipper https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/the-history-of-the-slipper the history of the slipper
the history of the slipper
the history of the slipper
mahabis

the history of the slipper

 

Feeling comfortable is one of life’s simple pleasures. Whether it’s sleeping on a pillow, lying on a soft mattress, or slipping into warm slippers, these little luxuries have all become part of our daily routines. And from travel pillows to memory foam mattresses, most have evolved to keep up with the pace and expectations of today’s society. Here at mahabis, we’ve taken on the challenge of redesigning the slipper for the 21st century. However, before we look at the role of the slipper today, we thought we’d look into where, when, and how exactly the slipper has changed over time. Whilst the slipper is generally accepted as a simple and mundane object that quietly features in our everyday lives, few of us know more about it than that. So, keep reading to find out more about how, whilst the design and aesthetic may have changed considerably over time, the need to have warm and comfortable feet is still as important as it is today.

  

slipper origins

The word ‘slipper’ was first recorded in English in 1478, however it seems the slipper has been around for much longer. It turns out Spanish cave drawings that date back to more than 15,000 years ago illustrate humans wearing animal skin and animal fur around their feet, what one would assume was a make-do shoe or slipper for the time. At Boscombe Down, roman bodies have been in the process of being dug up for the last fifteen years, so you might expect that if anything interesting was going to be found it would have been found by now. However, in 2008, a peculiar unearthing made headlines. The focal point of a body that was unearthed in 2008 was interestingly not the poignant fact that she was curled up with a child, but rather the fact that she had been buried in her slippers. This suggests slippers go all the way back to 200AD. It is believed her slippers indicate her high social status, as the majority of the remaining 300 bodies there were wearing traditional boots (for their journey into the next life).

 

the invention

So, it is clear the slipper, or at least the idea of the slipper, has been around for longer than we imagined. However, who actually invented the first slipper remains distinctly unclear. A quick online search suggests that it was Alvin Slipper who invented the slipper, purely because he was fed up of his feet being cold, something which seems almost too simple to be true. Others say Florence Melton happened to invent the slipper by chance in the 1940s. Whilst she was investigating materials to improve the the helmets worn by World War II crew men, Melton discovered a perfect material for slippers. Foam. The softness of the material and its ability to be easily washed turned it into the perfect slipper for soldiers; indeed, Melton herself stated back in 2001, "I always thought in terms of filling a need.  Melton’s discovery led to the invention of the first foam soled and washable slipper and to the Dearfoams brand, which is still around today.

 

12th century vietnam 

Whilst the official discovery of the idea might have stemmed from either Slipper or Melton’s discoveries, the first actual recorded mention of the slipper is in Vietnam all the way back in the 12th century. Back then, slippers were not the simple everyday comfort we see them as today, but instead they were a symbol of captivity. It was the female servants of rich sultans who wore them, as their loose fit and soft sole was a means of preventing them from running away easily on the rocky terrain outdoors.

 

the babouche

Some centuries later the slipper was developed in the middle east for a much less sinister reason. The moroccan babouche comes from the Arabic 'babush' or Persian 'papush'. Inspired by the open back sandal, the focal point of the babouche is it’s exaggerated point at the toes. This, along with its ultra-soft design is said to reflect the fact that its wearers (often monarchs and 17th century french courtiers) cared excessively about their lifestyle and their appearance. They led a luxurious life, looked after by gophers and drivers, which ensured their footwear remained in excellent condition whilst they indulged in such optimum comfort. The particular softness of the babouche stems from the process by which it is made: it is cleaned and dried repeatedly until it meets the prime level of softness. Despite what we might think of as a bizarre appearance that is surely outdated, the babouche featured in Vogue just last year, named as 2016’s must have shoe. Artisan babouche slippers are still made nowadays in markets across Marrakech, Morocco, and remain a cultural icon.

 

the history of the slipper

 

 

the furlane 

Around the same time, Italians were discovering yet another use of the slipper. The Venetian Furlane became particularly popular in the 16th century with Gondoliers. Whilst maintaining the comfort associated with the slipper, the furlane also had a much more practical purpose. It’s rubber sole, made from old bicycle tyres, ensured that the gondoliers didn’t slip and also that they didn’t mark the paint on the gondolas. Meanwhile, the velvet upper (made from old dresses and curtains), preserves the elegant aesthetic associated with Venetian culture. Many are still made by hand, which serves to maintain the authenticity of the slipper. Being both practical and attractive, the furlane slipper can still be seen around Venice today, both on the feet of gondoliers as they glide around the city, and for sale down cobbled alleys, drawing in numerous tourists with their rich history.

 

the history of the slipper

 

the prince albert slipper

Interestingly, it seems slippers and elegance remained intertwined throughout the centuries. As we move into the Victorian era, we see the appearance of the ‘Prince Albert Slipper’. These are named after Queen Victoria’s husband because it was he who is said to have introduced the idea of the luxurious leather upper. Made with velvet, and lined with silk and a leather sole, these slipper-shoes were particularly elegant and attractive looking. They were worn by members of aristocracy in stately homes for dinners of a black dress code; to see a dinner suit worn along with a pair of slippers was far from unusual, something that might come as a surprise in today’s society.

Prince Albert Slippers were initially used simply for moving between rooms, clubs and smoking rooms at these dinners. Due to the latter, they have been informally renamed ‘smoking shoes’ more recently. Despite beginning as a British icon, these slippers have made an appearance and a name for themselves in Hollywood, being pictured worn by celebrities such as Peter Lawford and Douglas Fairbanks Jr later in the 1940s and 50s. Even several decades after that, popular names such as Pharrell Williams and Kanye West have been seen wearing their slippers out and about. Ryan Gosling wore a pair on the US chat show, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, making a statement that slippers are still significant and very much part of today’s culture. This was taken to an extreme in 2007, when a man named Derek Fan (also referred to as ‘the slipper man’), entered the Guinness book of records for wearing his dress slippers for a ground-breaking 23 years without ever taking them off.

 

the history of the slipper

 

 

the uwakbuki slipper

A place where slippers are certainly no thing of the past is Japan. It remains a social obligation in Japan to take off your outdoor shoes as soon as you arrive indoors, (whether that be at a house, hotel, or school) and to swap them for a pair of slippers, that are usually lying ready and waiting. People are expected to leave their shoes at the door both as a sign of respect, and due to the belief that the feet are supposed to need to rest after a long day of work. It is often the host who provides the slippers, and it is custom to bring a pair of your own socks to slip into before wearing them. The specific area dedicated to where the shoes are left is known as the ‘genkan’, and is generally acknowledged as one of the most fundamental aspects of Japanese culture. Meanwhile, the light and comfortable slippers that are left ready to change into are known as ‘uwabuki’. Even if you are just visiting Japan it is usually expected to respect this custom and slip into your slippers at the entrance to anywhere indoors.

 

the history of the slipper

 

 

the mocassin

Whilst not a formal part of culture, like in Japan, the mocassin slipper is a style that can often be seen worn today. Largely associated with Native American culture, the design of the mocassin is simple, aligning with the Native American’s belief in minimal waste. Using animals every catch for either food or clothing, moccasins were originally made out of soft leather, usually deerskin. The slippers were often bright and had colourful scenes of nature painted on them, which distinguished the different tribes from one another. The tribes would also personalise them with the way that they shaped the shoe or how they decorated them with their own beadwork. You can see how much the design varied from tribe to tribe across North America here. Whilst mocassin slippers are generally made by machines in today’s society, (with an added fur lining for warmth and comfort), many Native American craftsmen still make handmade products too.

 

the 21st century

A world apart from the simplicity of the Japanese slipper or the elegance of the furlane, the western world has produced a variety of slippers in the 21st century to satisfy people’s demand for comfort. Ranging from fluffy animal figures or children’s favourite cartoon characters, to what might be known as ‘grandad’ slippers, there is undeniably a wide range of options for slipper wearers to choose from. Despite even Dorothy’s famous ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz drawing attention and fame to the world of slippers, no particular design has quite succeeded in maintaining a lasting presence in today’s society. 

 

mahabis

Whilst it is clear that there is still a cultural need for slippers all these centuries later, there remains an abyss when it comes to finding the one slipper that fits all cultures, in all situations. This is where mahabis comes in. Reinventing the slipper from the ground up, fusing Scandinavian minimalism with cultural influences from across the globe, mahabis are slippers that blend together a heritage-soaked aesthetic with modern design. Fitting in with the demands of a busy 21st century world, the detachable sole that comes with mahabis slippers allows you to pop from indoors or outdoors in seconds.

At mahabis, we pride ourselves on innovation, and that is why with a choice from a classic, summer, or luxe edition, you can be sure to find the perfect slipper to help you put your feet up, and relax.

 

the history of the slipper



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mahabis moments https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/everyday-adventures mahabis moments
slippers
mahabis moments
mahabis

mahabis moments

 

mahabis is the slipper for your everyday adventures, and we thought we'd take a look at how they fit into our mahabis wearer's everyday lives, and the various activities they become part of. 

 

on the go //

Step out in comfort, with our detachable soles.

mahabis moments

photo: @cirkeline

 

packing //

 Take that feeling of home with you, wherever you go.

mahabis moments

photo: @thinkpoppy

 

 

downtime //

Start the weekend with your feet up. 

photo: @seaofatlas

 

coffee //

The best way to ease into the day ahead.

 mahabis moments

photo: @mediajamshidi

 

art //

Let the comfort inspire you to bring out your artistic side. 

photo: @lacymartindesign 

 

 

If you enjoyed our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet.

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mahabis stories // discovering rjukan, norway https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/discovering-rjukan-norway mahabis stories // discovering rjukan, norway
rjukan, norway
mahabis stories // discovering rjukan, norway
mahabis

mahabis stories // discovering rjukan, norway

 

The place behind the name for our Rjukan Red sits at the foot of Norway's most beautiful mountain, Gaustatoppen. Rjukan itself is a UNESCO world heritage site, and has a rich history to boot. 

The town is named after Rjukan Falls, a 104m waterfall to the west. Literally translated it means 'the smoking waterfall', a nod to the froth and mist it creates, and giving it an air of mystery. The waterfall is a hugely popular tourist attraction in the area, as well as a great feat of engineering. It generates a huge amount of electricity and was one of the first waterfalls to be illuminated by the electricity it produces. The falls have been a muse for many an artist and are also a draw for ice climbers when the temperatures drop. It's touted as one of most well known ice climbing destinations in Europe, with over 140 frozen waterfalls, and good climbing infrastructure.

 

 

Another natural beauty in the area is the Hardangervidda National Park, which features the beautiful mountain of Gaustatoppen. In the summer it's a common hiking destination and in winter, the perfect landscape for skiing. The hotels in the mountains are famed within Norway and staying in a 'høyfjellshotell' is highly recommended for a traditional experience. If it's traditional food you're looking for then all accounts indicate you should head to Rjukan Fjellstue. Around 12km outside the town, and claiming to serve food from 'nature', dishes include reindeer, sour cream pudding, trout, salmon, waffles and pastries. 

 

 

Due to it's positioning in the valley, the town lies overshadowed by the surrounding mountains and for seven months of the year receives no direct sunlight. In 1928, the Krossobane Cable Car was built so that residents were able to reach the summit and get some sunlight. One of the first in Northern Europe, it was gifted from the owners of the hydroelectricity plant at the time - Norsk Hydro - to the town. The cable car still runs to is day and has two cars, (named after the cranberry and blueberry in a testament to the Nordic love of berries) which travel up 886m to some of the most stunning views available in the area.

 



If the idea of a 90 year old cable car sends you a little skittish, there's also the 'Gaustabanen', a funicular which carries passengers deep into Gaustatoppen and right to the top. This was opened in 1959, and the steep ride was primarily used by Norwegian Army. Luckily for us, it was opened to the public in 2010. The most recent of incredible solutions to the shadow problem was completed in 2013 and cost 5 million kroner. Huge mirrors were installed atop the mountains to redirect the sunlight to the town. 

It's rich history is also embedded in the water of the falls. One of the few places in Europe to make heavy water, an important ingredient in the first nuclear bombs was Vemork. During the second world war, the plant was attacked by resistance fighters. The mission ended up being critical in preventing Germany from developing the atom bomb. For those interested in the history there's an Industrial Workers’ Museum which is full of the tales of years long passed, and the importance of Rjukan in the history of Europe.

discovering rjukan

If you enjoyed our post, feel free to share it via our ready to go tweet. 

images // yoori koo, riciardus, bilfinger se
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mahabis reviews // part one https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-reviews-part-one mahabis reviews // part one
mahabis reviews
mahabis reviews // part one
mahabis

mahabis reviews // part one

 

We love hearing back from our mahabis wearers about what they think of their mahabis, so we've picked a few of our favourite reviews to share.

 

'never been a big slipper wearer,  have barely taken them off as they are so comfortable. try a pair - you won't regret it!' - d. walter

 

mahabis // customer thoughts  

‘love mahabis, i work from home so live in them’ - r. thompson

 

'love this product. love the design. love the comfort and warmth. [...] i bought a pair for everyone in my family.' - c. bermundo 

 

'this product is flawless and a great experience. congrats to mahabis for nailing this' - l. akse

 

mahabis // customer thoughts

 

‘Wish I’d gotten them sooner’ - s. eway

 

I got them for my husband for a gift and he is in love with them. They were something he never knew he was looking for! - m. tripaldi    

 

'I am so excited about my new slippers. They just arrived and I so far could not be happier! The size is perfect, I love how the soles snap on and off, and the feel inside is cozy. I highly recommend.'

 

mahabis // customer thoughts

'Love the concept. Love the shoe.'   

 

‘I absolutely fell in love with the concept of taking off the soles of your shoes/slippers. I can't wait to see what they do in the future and i'll definitely keep watching. thanks for a really neat product that gets used daily around our home! - d. mize

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mahabis stories // discovering larvik https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-stories-discovering-larvik mahabis stories // discovering larvik
discovering larvik, norway
mahabis stories // discovering larvik
mahabis

mahabis stories // discovering larvik

 

Continuing our coverage of the origin stories of our colours, we move on to Larvik. One of our classic colours, Larvik Grey is named after a town and municipality in Vestfold county, Norway. The birthplace of explorer Thor Heyerdahl, and the first entry point of the vikings is edged with lighthouses. They perch on rock clusters resembling cartoon clouds and illuminate the water that is crucial to the town's heritage and survival.

 

 

The name itself was first recorded around the 1500s, used by Dutch sailors. Its rapid growth ensued until the opening of the port around 150 years later, and a naval base shortly after that. The Larvik coat of arms even features a silver mast with three sails, the area now maintains it's nautical link to Denmark here with ferries leaving every day and the draw of the maritime museum. These days it offers much more than that though, with coastal walks, shopping, sightseeing and a popular arena. Coming up soon is the annual Larvik GitarFestival - a rock festival which draws musicians to jam together in March. If you're too late for that, you could catch Handball tournaments this summer - very popular in the area and drawing worldwide competitors.



 

Other notable places within the municipality include the first town in Norway. It's named Kaupang and founded in Larvik in 800AD. Originally a hub and a busy crossroad of trade routes, its main draw now is tourism. Visiting the Viking Town is a rich historical experience, with opportunities to see a replica Viking house, and a model of olden day Kaupang. It's only open during the summer season but has activities for families and history buffs alike. Much of the city is still not excavated, despite having been under research since the 1800's, therefore remains a rich and reasonably untouched treasure trove.

 



Most popular to visit in the summer is Stavern. Adorably known as "The Dimple of Norway", it's actually the smallest town in Norway. Slightly south of the city of Larvik sits this truly idyllic town amongst coastline dotted with lighthouses. Famed for attracting artists, inspiring musicians and poets it's still known for art galleries and exhibitions. From here visit the Svenner archipelago and its picturesque red lighthouse (Svenner Fyr).





To the west of Larvik is Mølen Geological Park, a UNESCO heritage site and part of one of the largest natural monuments from the last Ice Age. This is where you'll catch a glimpse of 230 burial mounds from the Iron and Bronze ages to satiate any historical curiosity, or spy the true inspiration for our Larvik Grey - Norway's national rock type - Larvikite.

Why not check out our larvik light grey classic slipper with a larvik grey sole...

 mahabis stories // discovering larvik

 

If you enjoyed our post, why not share it with our ready to go tweet link.

 

images // cem sagisman, arnstein ronning, mahlum, astrid westvang

 

 

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mahabis around the world https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-around-the-world mahabis around the world
mahabis worldwide
mahabis around the world
mahabis

mahabis around the world

 

We love seeing how our mahabis wearers like to wear their mahabis, and the variety of locations that they end up in across the world. From Nami Island to Madrid, from sea to snow, we decided to take a look at where in the world our mahabis wearers are deciding putting their feet up.

 

seoul, south korea //

mahabis around the world

photo: @fauzimausi

 

 

lisbon, portugal // 

mahabis around the world

photo: @hey.luisa

 

 

hokkaido, japan //

mahabis worldwide
photo: @fauzimausi

 

 

 madrid, spain //

mahabis around the world

photo: @daasc

 

nami island, south korea // 

mahabis around the world


photo: @fauzimausi 

 

 

port alice, british columbia //

mahabis around the world

photo: @westcoastlife

 

If you enjoyed our post, feel free to share it via our ready to go tweet link.

 

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mahabis journal // spring traditions around the world https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/spring-traditions-around-the-world mahabis journal // spring traditions around the world
spring traditions
mahabis journal // spring traditions around the world
mahabis

mahabis journal // spring traditions around the world

 

Spring as a season offers many things. The change in daylight savings, the blue reappearing in the sky and the flowers emerging from the ground signify the end of winter. For some places, it also indicates the future success of the harvest and new life. Many cultures celebrate with parties, fiestas, and traditions as they enter the new season. We share with you our favourites from around the world. 

 

Holi festival // india

Likely one of the most famous festivals of spring, the Holi colour festival, originating in India, is highly photogenic due to its vibrant nature. It is celebrated with street parties, parades and festivals in which everybody throws colourful chalk powder. Its uplifting nature has now spread around the world. With western cities such as Berlin, Utah, and London now throwing colour to signify the prominence of good over evil, and to have fun make friendships and let go of negativity.

 

 

spring equinox // england

For those who don't know, Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument situated in the south west of England, close to Salisbury. It's understood to have been built 5000 years ago, but the builders and purpose remain a mystery. Each year at the spring solstice, almost 1000 people gather to watch the sunrise above the stones. A tradition with beginnings in pagan and druid history, it has become popular for those who would like to feel a spiritual link to their predecessors.

 



manhattanhenge // new york city

An interesting spin-off of the Stonehenge solstice gathering (without the spiritual connotations) is that dubbed 'Manhattanhenge'. Twice a year the sun aligns with the east-west grid of Manhattan, allowing a stunning sunset between the skyscrapers. It is wondered what civilisation will think in thousands of years of the city grid that aligns perfectly around the solstice, as we ponder Stonehenge.

 



songkran water festival // thailand

The name of the festival derives from a Sanskrit word translating to 'transformation' or 'change'. Literally the festival of the change of seasons, traditionally it's celebrated with some truly lovely traditions. These include the offering of food to the temples and monks who live there and the pouring of water on buddha statues and elders hands to wash away bad luck. These days, although old traditions still arise, it is celebrated less formally with parades and colourful festivals in which people splash one another with water and dance.

 

 

hanami cherry blossom // japan

Originating in Japan, the cherry blossom festivals we see widespread internationally are traditionally called 'hanami' which means 'flower viewing'. The period of hanami lasts for around two weeks each year (somewhere between March and May) and is planned according to the 'blossom forecast'. In some places yozakura is also observed, which is essentially the appreciation of the blooms at night, lit by paper lanterns. Appreciation of this beauty in festival form can now be found in Vancouver, San Francisco and Georgia to name but a few. 

 

images // maxime bhm, antonina bukowska, jj harrison, sevtibidou

 

If you enjoyed our post why not retweet it via our ready-to-go tweet.

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mahabis stories // discovering gotland https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/discovering-gotland mahabis stories // discovering gotland
mahabis stories // discovering gotland
mahabis stories // discovering gotland
mahabis

mahabis stories // discovering gotland

 

At mahabis, our design aesthetic is largely based on scandinavian minimalism. From Larvik to Skane, each of our brand colours is named after a specific Scandinavian town or city. We decided to celebrate the influences behind the names of our colours and styles, beginning with our Gotland Green.

Gotland Green is named after the largest island in Sweden. It translates literally to 'a different land, and certainly lives up to that name. It's now a UNESCO world heritage site, and archaeological digs have found evidence to indicate it's age at over 5000 years old. Ensconced by the Baltic Sea, lying about 90km East of the mainland you'll find a tranquil location. With a small population mostly concentrated in the capital Visby. The elders unpon the island still very much see themselves as Gotlanders rather than swedes; a throwback to its independence in early history.

 



The capital itself is a goldmine of stunning medieval architecture, including churches like St Karins Kyrka, noted for its gothic interior and octagonal wonder Helge and Kyrka. More lively activities include the Island Games, which rotate between islands (Faroe Islands, Aland Islands, Isle of Wight, Gibraltar, Jersey, Gotland, Isle of Man, Guernsey, Shetland, Rhodes, Aland Islands, Isle of Wight, Bermuda and Jersey) each year. 2017 is Gotland's year once more. Another fun tradition is 'Medeltidsveckan' - or medieval week. It takes place in August each year. Festivites include large feasts, medieval dress, jousting and markets. Delicacies of the island are lamb-centric, with the most difficult to find dish consisting of a sheeps head, understandably not sold in many restaurants. For dessert you can expect a more appetising treat - saffron pancakes served with dewberries is the local preference.


The rugged and ever changing landscape of the island will likely require a car to get around easily, and allow you to adequately take in the beauty and haunting serenity in full. As you explore, you'll find reminders of the Viking history entrenched at every turn. The unique picture stones (supposedly found only on the island) tell intriguing stories of viking lore. To the south of the island you'll find the Museum Lars Johnsson, which holds paintings and watercolours, plus a cinnamon scented cafe. 


For those adventurers amongst us, the blue lagoons and caves are an example of how Gotland has conserved it's natural beauty. Many urban legends exist around the discovery of the now well-trodden routes through the Grottos. Hike, paddle or bike your way around Visby, the beaches and it's surrounds for an outdoorsy adventure.

 

 

images // wikimedia commons: gotland

 

...check out mahabis larvik light grey slippers with a gotland green sole here.

gotland green 

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the tree hotel // sweden https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/tree-hotel-sweden the tree hotel // sweden
the mirrorcube, sweded
the tree hotel // sweden
mahabis

the tree hotel // sweden

 

Found in Harads, northern Sweden, this mirrored glass box hides the perfect getaway location. Suspended high in the trunk of a tree, this 4x4x4 metre cube is built with reflective glass to reflect its surroundings and the sky. Designed by Tham & Videgârd, its camouflaged image reflects the starting point of the Mirrorcube - the relationship between man and nature. The tree hotel fits two people, and is only accessible via the rope bridge that is attached to the adjacent trees, making it the ideal retreat from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. 

 

the mirrorcube 

the mirrorcube

 

the mirrorcube 

the mirrorcube

 

the mirrorcube 

 

the mirrorcube // sweden 

 tree hotel // sweden

 

tree hotel // sweden  

 

photos and design: tham & videgârd
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mahabis interviews // ian andrew nelson https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-interviews-ian-nelson mahabis interviews // ian andrew nelson
mahabis ambassador // ian andrew nelson
mahabis interviews // ian andrew nelson
mahabis

mahabis interviews // ian andrew nelson

 

Before we begin, describe what you do in a sentence.

I am the Creative Director for Remember Nhu and a Freelance Commercial and Travel Photographer. 

 

ambassador // ian andrew nelson

 

When did you start taking an interest in photography?

Actually it was when I first got an iPhone about 6 years ago! My whole life I've always enjoyed snapping photos here and there, but it was never an actual hobby (none-the-less a career) until the iPhone and Instagram started pushing me to get out in the wild with friends, shooting landscapes through mobile photography.

 

Talk us through a typical day in your life.

This actually varies a ton depending on the day. One day I might be working remote from a coffee shop in Portland, or where I live. On a different day I may be traipsing around Kenya or Romania on a work trip with Remember Nhu. On another day I’m in the car for a long road trip with Land Rover doing some commercial shooting. On a different day, my wife and I may be reviewing a hotel or tourist destination in a new place for our Travel Blog. Needless to say, things stay interesting.

 

ian nelson 

 

Where do you find it easiest to work?

For me it’s anywhere with wifi, space for my laptop, and good coffee! My whole work life is 100% remote, so I guess the world is my office!

 

mahabis ambassador // ian andrew nelson

 

If experiencing a creative block, how do you recharge your creativity?

Great question. I have two answers:

Try new places, and try new people. First, try going somewhere new.

 

Personally, traveling in general tends to inspire me creatively because you get a new perspective and are exposed to new creative sources when you travel. I’ve heard it said, “If you want to take better photos, go to better places.” I agree but might tweak it to say, “If you want to take better photos, go to different places.” Just going somewhere new is a great start for breaking through creative block.

 

 

mahabis ambassador // ian andrew nelson

 

Second, I recommend going out and shooting or creating with someone new. When I’m around other artists, I see things done a different way, I ask them questions to pick up new tricks of the trade, and I get fresh inspiration for things to try within my own banding or aesthetic.

 

Out of all your travelling adventures, which has been your favourite, and why?

This is the most difficult question in the world to answer because I’ve been blessed to do so many amazing trips. I'd have to say my favourite trip was the first time I went to Thailand a few years back and was exposed to a bunch of the work I’m now a part of for anti-trafficking.

 

One city you’d never tire of returning to, and why…

Paris, France. The art, the buildings, the statutes, the coffee & croissants, the Eiffel Tower, the distinguished high culture. It has "all the vibes" and there’s just something so enchanting and relaxing about that place.


mahabis ambassador // ian andrew nelson

 

For you personally, how important is downtime? And how would you describe the ultimate way you’d choose to relax and unwind from a busy day…

Super important. Any of us would burn out if it was always go, go, go. All the time I say “no” to cool stuff in order to prioritize family, health and career longevity. My ultimate way to relax and unwind is to mix a Moscow Mule or Old Fashioned at home and cozy up to either a good book or the ultimate time-waster of the modern era: Netflix!

 

Three random picks from your bookshelf/ music collection. Go.

Great Book: The Expats by Chris Pavone

Great Band: Chairlift

Great Album: “I’m Alone, No You’re Not” by Joseph

 

If you had an extra hour in the day, how would you spend it?

Learning a new foreign language.

 

mahabis ambassador // ian andrew nelson

 

photos: ianandrewnelson photography

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sunday guide to // valencia https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/sunday-guide-to-valencia sunday guide to // valencia
sunday guide to valencia
sunday guide to // valencia
mahabis

sunday guide to // valencia

 

Continuing our Sunday guide series, we travel to Valencia. Read on to share in our recommendations on what to see, do and eat before resting your head in one of Spain's most vibrant year-round destinations.


 

see //

Valencia is so diverse that it's certainly not possible to see even a fraction of the sights in just one day. For instance, there are hundreds of plazas across the city, but you can narrow it down by visiting Plaza Redonda. It's is a must-see due to its unusual design and quirky contents. Not a square like most other plazas, Redonda is a circle filled with stalls selling everything from souvenirs to pet birds.

Diving the city almost exactly in half we have the Turia Gardens. After severe flooding in the 1950s, the city conjured up a plan to divert the River Turia outside of the city. From this sprung the need for a regeneration project, turning an empty bed where the Turia river used to run, into the largest urban park in Spain. Here you'll find every variety of small wheeled transport available. Whether you prefer to cycle, blade, hover, skateboard or simply walk, ambling the gardens is a must whilst visiting the city.

If you're willing to venture out of the city, you'll find Albufera about six miles south. One of the most important wetlands in Europe, this is where you'll find the rice grown for all the delicious Valencian Paella. You won't have to venture far to get a taste either - restaurants selling the locally acclaimed dish smatter the lake.

 

 

do // 

If you happen to visit Valencia in the spring, you should try to catch the Les Falles. This traditional festival lands in March and is both spectacular and peculiar in equal measures. The city districts construct statues to exhibit and adorn the city for the week, whilst the people exuberantly throw fireworks and firecrackers in the street. Women dress up in traditional dresses to offer flowers to the Virgin Mary, before joining the men in setting off fireworks around 2 pm during what is called 'mascleta'.

Regardless of the time of year you visit, The City of Arts and Sciences is an architectural and cultural treat created in the diverted Turia river basin. Designed by local architects Santiago Calatrava and Félix Candela, it is a vast area featuring six constructs. El Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía is an arts centre and opera house; El Museu de les Ciències Príncipe Felipe the notorious Science museum; L'Hemisfèric contains the planetarium and Imax cinema; L'Umbracle is a landscaped walkway and garden; Oceanografic contains the open-air aquarium or 'oceanographic park'; Ágora is a hosting space used for a variety of events.

 

 

eat //

As previously mentioned, Paella is a big deal in the region. The rice is locally grown and the seafood locally caught, it's worth a try considering you'll probably never have a meal that travels less distance to your plate. The trick is knowing where to find the best one. Many tout the restaurants in the Albufera national park, amongst the rice growing wetlands as the winners, but it's rumoured that Malvarrosa city beach is the place to head in the city.

If it's tapas you seek, be sure to stay out of the main tourist areas. Although the glitzy views can be tempting, a true foodie will listen out for the terraces full of locals speaking only Spanish. These are usually the ones which will be slightly cheaper and a lot more authentic. 

Those who have self-catering accommodation should head to the Central Market to stock up on flavoursome seasonal produce. Not only a feast to pile high on your plate, the art nouveau market is a treat for the eyes. Built in the 1920's and one of the largest in Europe, it's worth a visit to peruse the produce atop the 1000+ stalls.

 

If you enjoyed our post, why not share it via our ready-to-go tweet link. 

 

 

 

images // max rentmeester, igor ovsyannykov, cel lisboa
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innovative light, by arturo alvarez https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/arturo-alvarez-lighting innovative light, by arturo alvarez
arturo alvarez
innovative light, by arturo alvarez
mahabis

innovative light, by arturo alvarez

 

We take a look at the work of designer Arturo Alvarez. Inspired by nature and the relationships between humans, he creates unique handmade lights to convey a more emotional lighting. Alvarez works with specific materials so that his lights surpass the everyday, and instead express much more through their brightness, character and uniqueness. This play of lights is intended to inspire a more emotional reaction. Scroll on to see some examples of Alvarez's designs...

 

emotional light, arturo alvarez

  

emotional light, arturo alvarez

 

emotional light, arturo alvarez

 

emotional light, arturo alvarez

 

emotional light, arturo alvarez 

emotional light, arturo alvarez

 

emotional light, arturo alvarez

 

To see more of Arturo Alvarez's work, click here.

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how to create your downtime haven https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/how-to-create-your-ideal-haven how to create your downtime haven
how to create your downtime haven
how to create your downtime haven
mahabis

how to create your downtime haven

 

A bedroom can be a sanctuary away from the world. A beautiful fort of comfort, and a place to hide away and renew your strength. Making your bed an expression of tranquility can change your mindset when you finally flop down between the sheets, it can invite downtime and dreams. Take a look at five simple steps to help make your bed a refuge of perfect slumber.

 

Sheets //

Take your comfort to another level with pure cotton sheets, that will help you to enter the world of coziness. In the summer your skin can breathe and in the winter the fabric is so soft to the touch you will never want to leave your kingdom of sleep. Check out these hand tailored ones from Evencki.

 

evencki bed linen

 

Layers //

The more layers are better. Choose a mattress topper, either duck feather or memory foam. Top that with a quilted cover and a blanket and suddenly you have a cloud like bed. Check out the mahabis blanket: generously sized and 100% wool, wrap it around you and lose yourself in its reassuring warmth.

 

how to create your downtime haven

 

Pillows //

Pillows can make all the difference to your world of slumber. We recommend having several different kinds to suit different moods. Down pillows are great for floating away, memory foam adapts to your shape, and small pillows add a little oomph and superior support. Why not spritz your pillows with lavender essential oils to help drift away into the sweetest dreams. 

 

Lights //

It’s no good sinking down into your private sanctuary if you need to get up to turn off the light. Opt for a low hanging light above your bed, fairy lights, or a lamp within reach. Take a look at Plumen lighting. Founded by multi-disciplinary designer, artist and creative, Nicolas Roope, these simple and subtle lights can make all the difference to your downtime. Why not add in a candle for added lighting ambiance.

 

 plumen lighting

 

the room// 

Making your bed every morning is a ritual we often forget to perform. Taking those few minutes each morning to straighten your sheets and plump your pillows is something your future self will fall in love with you for. Coming home from the outside world into a haven of a readymade bed works wonders for your self-worth and sleep mentality.

 

how to create your downtime haven 

 

 If you enjoyed reading our post, why not share it via our ready-to-go-tweet link.

 

 

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china. japan. morocco. // tea culture around the world https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/tea-around-the-world china. japan. morocco. // tea culture around the world
tea culture around the world
china. japan. morocco. // tea culture around the world
mahabis

china. japan. morocco. // tea culture around the world

 

Coffee can shake our senses and streamline our mind for productivity. Yet, sometimes caffeine can cause us to surpass the simple art of relaxation. When you want to melt into your softer side, the ritual of tea can be a great replacement. The art of tea is practiced across the world; from mint in Morocco to Zen like ceremonies in Japan. We invite you to embrace your own ritual with these tea leaf suggestions for your downtime…

 

top teas

 

Moonlight Jasmine Blossom //

Delicate as a strand of silk and as fragrant as a spring morning – this Japanese flower tea literally blooms in the water. The wildflower is plucked from the Okinawa region and hidden inside a tea ball to dry, before being scented eight times with jasmine. The presentation of this tea is a ritual in itself, save it for a special moment.

 

Maghrebi //

Also known as 'moroccan tea' or 'mint tea', maghrebi is a green tea prepared with spearmint leaves and sugar. A traditional social drink in Maghreb, it is the norm to welcome guests with it, and to drink at least cups whilst socialising. Known to quench thirst better than cold water, magrehbi is a welcome refreshing drink, particularly in hot climates.

 

Moonlight White // 

The poetically named and gently potent brew is a gorgeous gateway drink for those who are entering the world of tea. The title of this tea comes from the fact that you are supposed to wither the leaves under a slant of moonlight rather than the sun. Hints of smoked peach and a creamy finish make each sip a wonder to behold.

 

tea  

Yame No 5 // 

This sencha tea comes from the village of Hoshinomura in Japan. As soft as freshly mown grass and with mellow notes of roasted almond, every sip is fresh and pure on the palate. This is the perfect tea for quiet mornings contemplating the world outside your window.

 

Lapsang Souchong //

The first black tea in history, Lapsang Souchong is hailed as a living legend for tea sommeliers. All the way from Wuyi region of China, the leaves are traditionally dried on pinewood fires lending to the smoked flavor of this deliriously dark tea. Perfect for late mornings when you want to meditate over a book.

 

tea

 

 photos via unsplash
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relaxing road trips https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/relaxing-road-trips relaxing road trips
relaxing road trips
relaxing road trips
mahabis

relaxing road trips

 

“Now, on this road trip, my mind seemed to uncrinkle, to breathe, to present to itself a cure for a disease it had not, until now, known it had.” ― Elizabeth Berg.

 

The open road shimmering on the horizon, a destination unknown, and the power of feeling that you are in the driver’s seat. This is the essence and allure of the road trip. From the scorching sun of the Pan American highway to roads that wind through ice encrusted mountains; time behind the wheel gives you the chance to dream. Take a look at the world’s most inspiring road trips and prepare to let your mind wander.

 

Glen Coe, The Scottish Highlands // 

Glorious sun dappled glens, glowering mountains, and soft heather – the highlands welcome you with open arms. Meander around the A82 in-between the folds of brooding buttresses. Pull over along the way to walk in fairy forests and sip whiskey at the distilleries.

 relaxing road trips

 

Amalfi Coast, Italy //

A ribbon like road flutters along the pretty blue coast, punctuated with pastel colored villages clinging to the cliffs. The Amalfi Coast is a postcard image, weave your way through sleepy fishing villages, stopping only to breathe in the salt sea air, gorge on pizza, and sip homemade limoncello.

 

relaxing road trips

 

 

Atlantic Road, Norway //

Norway’s Atlantic Road is like driving to the very edge of the world. This is a place where the road dips and rises like a rollercoaster, where the ocean crashes at the feet of towering mountains, and where tiny fishing villages hunker down in sweet simplicity.

 

relaxing road trips

 

Ruta 23, Argentina //

Passing through Patagonia’s unforgiving landscape is nothing short of iconic. The jagged peaks of Mt Fitz Roy, the wide and open plains with wild horses, and the changing sky that floods and clears – this is the epitome of a wild and untamed road trip.

 

relaxing road trips

 

Uluru, Northern Territory Australia //

While others may rave about the blues and whites of the Great Ocean Road, Uluru will take you to the heart of fire. The rusted red landscape, endless stretch of outback, and indigenous mythologies soak the road in splendour.

 

relaxing road trips 

photos via behance 

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

 

 

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into the fog, by joel filipe https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/into-the-fog-by-joel-filipe into the fog, by joel filipe
into the fog, by joel silva
into the fog, by joel filipe
mahabis

into the fog, by joel filipe

 

We look at the work of digital designer and creative director Joel Filipe. On a walk on a foggy day in Madrid, Filipe captures some of Madrid's stunning buildings as they disappear in the sky. Living in a world where we often walk with our heads down, caught up in our own busy lives, taking the time to look up every now and then can be refreshing. So, why not sit back and enjoy the change of perspective Filipe's photography offers.

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, joel filipe

 

into the fog, by joel silva

 

into the fog, by joel silva

 

photos via behance

 

Feel free to share joel filipe's stunning photography via our ready-to-go tweet link.

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sunday guide to // rome https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/sunday-guide-to-rome sunday guide to // rome
sunday guide to rome
sunday guide to // rome
mahabis

sunday guide to // rome

 

Italy is one of those romanticised places, heavily featured in film, television and even music. Not without good reason, though; the language, the food, the architecture and the atmosphere... Certain places in Italy invoke those feelings of freedom and openness which lead to the creation of irreplaceable memories. Rome is a city like no other. Rich with history and the supposed birthplace of civilisation, we've collated the musts for a modern twist on the ancient city.

 

 

eat // 

Italian food reaches far beyond the country's borders, inspiring sub-cuisines and chefs, cookbooks and restaurants around the world. True Italian food at it's best is rustic and simple, featuring fresh ingredients such as basil, tomato and mozzarella heavily in menus. If this is the type of food you seek on your trip to Roma, look no further than the traditional Trattorias. The Pigneto neighbourhood especially features chic little eateries like Porchettoni. Here you'll taste olives like nowhere else and rich house wines served by carafe, not bottle.

 

do //

This truly is an experience you'll never have seen before, and most likely will never see anywhere else. You can train to be a gladiator for as little as a two hour class, in order to get a taste of the battle skills and gall needed by a true Roman gladiator. Alternatively, should you be lucky enough to stay longer, you may enroll in Gladiator School, to learn theory, history, practical skills and gain a real understanding of the lifestyle of the ferocious warriors.

 

 

see //

The Pyramid of Cestius is essentially a 2000-year-old pyramid in the centre of Rome. It's actually built into the ramparts, or city walls which were commissioned by Emperor Aurelian. An intriguing sight, the juxtaposition of the crude construction with the stunning architecture that surrounds it is curious.

Sadly the story behind its arrival in Rome isn't nearly as odd as the way it looks in it's placing. Quite simply, the Italians went through a fashion of taking inspiration from Egypt. It was constructed as Gaius Cestius' tomb but isn't a well known tourist attraction as it only opens two days per month.

 

stay //

After the delicious food, exploration and potential warrior experience, you'll need somewhere comfortable and fresh to rest your weary head. If you like to stay in a room with a view then Boscolo Exedra is the place for you. Overlooking Piazza della Repubblica, this luxurious offering allows you to bathe in Rome's only rooftop pool. Edged with cabanas, it provides a regal view and a feeling of grandeur of times long past. 

For those who like to feel close to the bustle of a city rather than perched over it, the G Rough has a more artsy, boutique feel. Nestled in the bosom of Piazza di Pasquino it proudly displays soft furnishings, art and decor from homegrown designers and artisans of the mid-1900s.

 

 

 

images // Ludwig Thalheimer, Chantel Lucas, Jan Tielens

 

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five scandinavian foods to try https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/ice-fire-and-feasts-scandinavian-foods-to-love five scandinavian foods to try
ice, fire and feasts; five scandinavian foods to love
five scandinavian foods to try
mahabis

five scandinavian foods to try

 

When the world outside is stark and white with skeletal trees and frozen lakes; nothing can compare to curling up beneath a blanket and indulging in pure comfort food until Spring. Fortunately, Scandinavia knows how to whip up wonderful feasts from foraged berries, the land and the sea. Read on to find out more about these delights from the land of ice and fire and Viking lore.

 

five scandinavian foods to try

 

 

Smørrebrød //

The Danish open faced sandwich is the stuff of legends. Hearty, dark rye bread is topped with sweet salt beef, pretty pickled herring with biting horseradish cream, or cured salmon with a slice of lemon and dill. The Smørrebrød is an art form – an integral part of café culture.

 

The Swedish waffle //

The Swedish waffle is thin and crisp and warm on the tongue. Waking up early on a cold day, padding softly to the kitchen and cooking up sweet waffles is the epitome of a sleepy Sunday morning. Blend beautiful frozen fjord cultures by topping with a dollop of bright and sour cloudberry jam. 

 

fjord culture

 

Artsoppa //

Served on Thursdays, when the wind is biting and you want to sit at a trestle table and sup something warm. This golden and glorious yellow split pea soup is simmered with sweet marjoram and salted pork. Serve with a glob of fiery mustard and a shot of arak and thin pancakes for dunking.

 

Kanelbullar //

On frosty afternoons when the sun sinks low, nothing can brighten a dark sky like a fluffy bun doused in cinnamon. These melt on the tongue treats are perfect served with a tall glass of milk or ripe coffee, preferably while gathered for a catch up with your closest friends.

 

ice, fire and feasts; five scandinavian foods to love

 

 

Fried Herring //

Tiny fish fresh from the icy waters, mashed potato doused in fragrant parsley butter, and a spoonful of ripe lingonberries to bring a kiss of sweetness. This dish is the ultimate in comfort food fancy and is best enjoyed after a winter walk through a silent forest.

 

five scandinavian foods to love

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

 

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atmospheric norway, by nikita shuliahin https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/atmospheric-norway-nikita-shuliahin atmospheric norway, by nikita shuliahin
norway
atmospheric norway, by nikita shuliahin
mahabis

atmospheric norway, by nikita shuliahin

 

Norway is often known for being one of the most beautiful countries in the world. From it's glaciers to it's fjords, there is no denying the overwhelming natural beauty you can encounter there. We decided to take a look at some of Ukranian photographer Nikita Shuliahin's work, whose 'Atmospheric Norway' series captures some of Norway's lesser known spots. This lesser known landscape adds another layer to the scenery of Norway, one that is simultaneously captivating and haunting. Sit back, relax and lose yourself in these fascinating images.

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

atmospheric norwary

 

photos via behance

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minimalist seating series, by wootek lim https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/minimalist-seating-series-wootek-lim minimalist seating series, by wootek lim
wa series
minimalist seating series, by wootek lim
mahabis

minimalist seating series, by wootek lim

 

Eastern and Western cultures consider the concept of space very differently. Whilst Eastern cultures are traditionally seen as preferring floor based sitting and slippers, Western cultures prefer sitting on chairs and sleeping on beds. Wootek Lim's 'wa series' takes these two different lifestyles and combines them into one. His design, combining the pillow, the legless chair, and the chair, is aimed at maintaining simplicity whilst also providing sufficient support.

 

minimalist seating

 

minimalist seating series

 

minimalist seating

 

minimalist seating

 

minimalist seating

 

minimalist seating

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link. 

 

To see more of Wootek Lim's work, click here.

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feet up. mahabis on. unwind together. https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/feet-up-slippers-on-unwind-together feet up. mahabis on. unwind together.
feet up. slippers on. unwind together.
feet up. mahabis on. unwind together.
mahabis

feet up. mahabis on. unwind together.

 

At mahabis we truly value our downtime. In the midst of the chaos of our day to day lives it’s important to take time to enjoy everything that you work so hard for. Often we focus on the serenity of spending time alone. It's at these times we're sure to put our mahabis on and breathe a sigh of content, whilst we absorb a good book or a simple moment of silence.

Whilst the peace of solitude is important to cherish, at this time of year we like to appreciate those we choose to surround ourselves with. Whether it be a partner, a friend or family, it’s important not to underestimate spending time with the people we love. Most of us are around others constantly, but the rush of the school run, pressure of productivity or a looming project can often occupy our minds.

Spending downtime with loved ones includes switching off from distractions, investing focus and energy into the people you are with. Take inspiration from the things you enjoy doing alone, and share your interests or hobbies with those you love. Take an interest in something your loved ones do, or something new and exciting. No matter the activity, just simply being with someone and sharing your downtime with someone else is relaxing.

In light of Valentine’s day we have asked some of our favourite ambassadors for their thoughts on how they like to unwind with others.

 

sharing downtime

jamie day 

 

"Once the children are in bed, we get to enjoy some downtime together. In most cases, after a day of dodging a minefield of Lego pieces, this will simply be knotting ourselves together on the sofa with a glass of red and a box set. This small yet essential daily luxury, gives us a chance to unwind, refuel and reconnect before we have to do it all over again in the morning."

 

sharing downtime

 

 

 

sharing downtime

laura pashby 

 

"On the rare occasions when my love and I get to spend a quiet morning together, it's pure luxury to cosy up and relax with a book and a cup of hot coffee."

 

sharing downtime

 

 

 

sharing downtime 

ali dover 

"Mine and my daughter Lucy's mahabis go literally everywhere with us; they are a tiny slice of home comfort and a natural treat for our feet."

 

sharing downtime

 

 

 

sharing downtime 

donna howell 

 

On the rare occasions that we have time sans child we love nothing more than a cosy day at home recharging with coffee, good food and a great box-set! The perfect way to unwind in comfort.

 

feet up. slippers on. unwind together.

 

 

feet up. mahabis on. unwind together.

 

 

If you enjoyed our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

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lunar effect, by mika suutari https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/lunar-effect-by-mika-suutari lunar effect, by mika suutari
lunar effect, mika suutari
lunar effect, by mika suutari
mahabis

lunar effect, by mika suutari

 

We take a look at the work of Finnish photographer Mika Suutari. Keen to take photos with a powerful atmosphere, Suutari's 'lunar effect' series captures night time at its best. The clear sky allows us to take in the magnitude of the universe we live in.

Sit back, relax, and lost yourself in some fascinating images of Finland at night.

 

lunar effect

 

lunar effect

 

lunar effect

 

lunar effect

 

lunar effect

 

lunar effect

 

Photos via behance

Click here to more of Mika Suutari's photography.

 

If you enjoyed our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

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minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2 https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/minimalist-instagram-inspiration-part-two minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2
minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2
minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2
mahabis

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

 

A short while ago we put together a few lesser known minimalist accounts. Here's another installation of inspiration to keep you going. Sit back, put your mahabis on, and enjoy.

 

lifestyle //

@labuchta is a Czech food blogger with a line of books. Featuring a lot of the stunning imagery and recipes from the books, their profile is worth a follow.

 

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

 

 

illustration //

@k.a.r.o.l.inka is a self-professed 'mother of wolves' and an artist attracted to simple things. Simple certainly equates to beautiful on this account, which flits between illustration and photography.

 

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

 minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

 

metal //

@wild_fawn_jewellery creates custom pieces of wearable art using precious metals. Hand made, sustainable, subtle pieces made in London adorn the Instagram profile, in addition to a smattering of flower petals and white linens.

 

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

 

 

abstract //

@encodedartwork, an account by graphic and abstract artist Richard Parsons features a broad range of works. Featuring photography, mixed media, graphic art and most recently, experiments in video, this one will continue to surprise and delight.

 

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

minimalist instagram inspiration, pt 2

 

 

If you enjoyed our post or have a suggestion on a great instagram account, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link. 

 

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relaxing cabin retreats https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/cabin-retreats relaxing cabin retreats
getaway cabins
relaxing cabin retreats
mahabis

relaxing cabin retreats

 

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach.” ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden

 

While the whisper of spring is still far from the horizon, now is the time to take advantage of dark nights and drizzly days. There is something about tramping across frozen ground and beneath the shadows of trees that makes you want to embrace the gift of downtime and write. For those who feel the need to put pen to paper escaping to remote and wild cabins could be just the answer to find a room of one’s own. Spend days collecting lingonberries and firewood, and evenings curled up beside the fire. Pack your journal, a cozy sweater, and lose yourself in the forest of your own thoughts.

 

cabins in the woods

 

 

Treehotel, Lulea, Sweden //

A tiny town hidden beneath the weight of snow – Lulea is celebrated as a simple place. Yet in the branches of the forest you will find architectural prowess as tiny homes cling to the trees. The Treehotel is one of the coolest B&B’s in the world with 7 different pods capturing 7 different styles. From the classic cabin hanging high in the canopy to the futuristic mirrored cube that sits camouflaged in-between the leaves, you can embrace pure cashmere Hygge beside the frozen lake.

 

cosy cabins in the woods

 

 

The Old Schoolhouse, Eilean Shona, Scotland //

The private island that whipped up the wonder of Neverland, Eilean Shona in Scotland was once a summer retreat for JM Barrie. The Scottish winds may whistle through the trees but you can take sanctuary inside The Old Schoolhouse. Toast your feet beside the coal fire, read by the flickering glow of gas lamp and sink down into a steaming claw footed tub at the end of the day.

 

 

Potter House, Dunton Hot Springs, Colorado //

Wake up to golden sunlight filtering through the peaks surrounding Potter House. In the calm of Colorado, the alpine ghost town of Dunton Hot Springs welcomes you in for a blissful escape. Trout fish shimmer in the ponds, sunset panoramas are sure to make you blush, and according to local lore this is where Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid hid out after their heist. With a fireplace in the master bedroom, exposed beams and tartan touches – this is the art of luxury wilderness living.

 

cosy cabins in the woods

 

 

Plusvilla L, Southern Finland //

Plusvilla L is a marvel of minimalist architecture and seems beautifully at home in the eerie landscape of Southern Finland, where the aurora borealis swirls against a midnight sky that doesn’t fade. Glass walls intercept scented pine and the in-house sauna provides pure rejuvenation after winter walks through forests seemingly frozen in time. Slate and wood floors, cream furnishings, and open plan living with few rooms ensures that Zen can flow through your pen as it does in this space. 

 

 cosy cabins in the woods

 

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link. 

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top ten coffee shops to visit worldwide https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/top-ten-coffee-shops-to-visit-worldwide top ten coffee shops to visit worldwide
top ten coffee shops
top ten coffee shops to visit worldwide
mahabis

top ten coffee shops to visit worldwide

 

As complex as wine, as ripe as spring, and a daily fix that boosts our energy – coffee can bring calm to a world of chaos. For dreamers, creatives, and those who dabble in small moments of luxury – coffee is nothing short of a ritual. Coffee shops can provide a church for that ritual.

Taking a moment to step away from the bustle of your day and sink into a steaming latte is something you can do across the globe. From the cherry blossoms of Japan to the snowy peaks of New Zealand – here are some of our favourite coffee shops in the world.

 

Skye Coffee, Barcelona //

A pop up coffee shop that took the Instagram world by storm – Skye Coffee started life as a food truck. The on the go coffee truck moved into Espacio 88, an eco-working space for creative types inside a simple warehouse. Beautiful flat whites are served out of a lovingly restored 1970’s Citroen truck in style.

 

skye cafe, barcelona

 

AP Café, Brooklyn //

Ever a haven for artists -Brooklyn has long been tempting the cool cult of modern society. AP Café provides a philosopher’s touch to the ethos of combing coffee with creative space. The décor is minimalist – a play on glass, wood, and light. Sit on a stone bench and sip a Vietnamese iced coffee while watching people scribe around you.

 

top ten coffee shops

 

Mirrors, Gifu, Japan //

In the spring, Japan turns into a frothy Monet picture of white and pink lace. The cherry blossoms are celebrated across the world and one coffee shop decided to make the most of this time. The Mirrors coffee shop in Gifu is true to its name - with mirrored gables reflecting the nature outside. Add in a Camilla tree, a white courtyard, and interior design that feels like you are sat beneath the boughs.

 

mirrors cafe, japan

 

 

Café Craft, Paris //

Freelancers descend upon Café Craft in the city of chic. The timeless black façade sits beside the hip Canal Saint Martin and offers long communal tables with a sleek and modern style. The café au lait and perfect buttered pastries stay true to the Parisian name.

 

top ten coffee shops

 

Knoll Ridge Café, New Zealand //

Drink a cup of hot java perched on the edge of a volcano at the Knoll Ridge Café. A feat of modern architectural design – this airy coffee shop is a wonder of blond timber, natural light, and alpine delights. Snuggle down with a coffee and feel safe and warm even when the winds are blowing and the snowstorms are settling in.

 

Dreamy Camera Café, South Korea //

One of the strangest, yet coolest coffee shops in the world – this is how you marry imagination and the art of coffee. A couple in South Korea built a café inside a giant Rolleiflex twin-lens camera. Rather than being glib with their design choice - the couple are camera enthusiasts with a love for sharing stories.

 

 

dreamy camera cafe

 

Café Ki, Tokyo //

Tokyo paves the way for ultra-minimalist Zen designs and Café Ki is its own haiku. A white forest in the heart of an urban city – this is pure space for both the body and mind. Slip your shoes off at the door, pad across the pale floor, and ponder over your coffee surrounded by steel trees and no distractions.

 

top 10 coffee shops


 

Haass Coffee, Cape Town //

Art and coffee collide at this chic venue in Cape Town. The Haass collective is so much more than coffee, it’s a collector’s gallery, an art studio and even an advertising business all in the same space. Deer antlers, wood panels, eclectic art, and whimsical furnishings provide the mise en scene. Haass also serves kopi luwak - one of the most expensive coffees in the world made from civet droppings.

 

Caffe Florian, Venice //

Some coffee shops have the architecture, others have the taste – but this one has the history. Caffe Florian is the oldest coffee house in Europe and has served cups to the likes of Goethe and Byron. The heritage and heart is overly romantic rather than cool, but with three hundred years of history and authentic 19th century wall panels you cannot help but get carried away.

 

top 10 coffee shops

 

Snickarbacken 7, Stockholm //

A 19th century building blends gothic touches with modern Swedish minimalism at Snickarbacken 7. Vintage fashion and books adorn the tables, a gallery sits to the side, and the taste of fine coffee transports you to NYC’s east village.


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five scandinavian habits worth adopting https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/mahabis-lifestyle-5-scandinavian-habits-to-adopt five scandinavian habits worth adopting
five scandinavian habits worth adopting
five scandinavian habits worth adopting
mahabis

five scandinavian habits worth adopting

 

With Scandinavian countries consistently topping the lists of 'happiest residents' and 'quality of life' it seems only pertinent that we take a closer look at what they are doing so right. 

 

five scandinavian habits worth adopting

 

// diet

Due to the location of many of the scandinavian countries, and their proximity to highly fishable waters, fresh fish plays a large part of their incredibly healthy diet. With less of an environmental impact and less distance travelled from sea to plate, fish is readily available and cost efficient. Trout, herring and salmon are full of protein, omega-3s and antioxidants and feature heavily in any Nordic meal. 

Popular fruit and vegetables include sprouts, kale and cabbage - some of the most nutritional veg with high levels of antioxidants. The same goes for the local berries. Rather than importing, they feast on lingonberries, blueberries and cloudberries. For a sweet and salty twist, it's not uncommon to eat grilled fish with lingonberry jam - a double whammy in terms of omega 3.

Not only are the Norwegians, Swedes and Danes particular about what they eat, but when they eat it. We've all heard the old adage 'Breakfast is the most important meal of the day' but in Scandinavia it's very strictly upheld. Most households will sit together for a full and fresh homemade breakfast to set them up for the day.

Perhaps these factors contribute to their impressive obesity levels; as low as 10% in Sweden. At any rate, a fresh and tasty diet and taking the time to enjoy your breakfast are all delightful habits to consider integrating. 

 

five scandinavian habits worth adopting

// equality

'Janteloven' is one of those fantastic words which don't translate directly into English. It is an essential part of Scandinavian culture, which encompasses the idea that no one is better than anyone else. There is a particular focus on gender equality. When it comes to not only pay but opportunity, Scandinavian countries seem to lead the charge.

 

five scandinavian habits worth adopting

 

// money

Scandinavian countries are consistently some of the richest countries in Europe. Although it hasn't always been the case, they are particular and competitive about keeping their economies strong. Well funded public sectors, consistent investment in Education and an alternative attitude to work-life balance all play a part in keeping Swedes, Danes and Norwegians happy and financially stable.

 

five scandinavian habits worth adopting


// chill

On any visit to Norway, you may hear the word 'kjedelig'. It's arguably the best of all the untranslatable Nordic words. Rather than being worked up about something annoying or rubbish that happened, Norwegians use this word to dismiss it as 'kind of boring'. Kjedelig is a fantastic way to describe something that you're not bothered about, and probably isn't worth your time. This attitude is something that infiltrates every sector of the National identity - essentially pretty tolerant and very chilled. 

The Danes have 'hygge' which is another lovely word (phonetically: hoo-ga) that covers all manner of things involved in relaxing and feeling comfortable. Any country that has an entire abstract philosophy around that is one of endless chill.

 

five scandinavian habits worth adopting


// chat

People tout the Germans for their efficiency, but in reality the Swedish do it better. This is especially true when it comes to conversation. In order to fit in as a true Swede it will be necessary to cut out all small talk. Apart from very polite hellos, goodbyes, pleases and thank-yous, don't expect to exchange pleasantries in order to fill silence or pass time. 

This can be read by other cultures as cold, or blunt, but understand that as soon as you cross the threshold into 'real conversation' there will be no holds barred. Nothing is off limits when it comes to topic, and all will be discussed with candour. 



As long as they continue to top the charts when it comes to quality of life and work-life balance we can confidently look to them for lifestyle inspiration, even if it means sacrificing small talk about the weather.

 

 

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images // jon flobrantclem onojeqhuomatthew henrybaim hanifmaria

 

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work-life balance in // iceland https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/work-life-balance-iceland work-life balance in // iceland
work-life balance in iceland
work-life balance in // iceland
mahabis

work-life balance in // iceland

 

Iceland is a country of contrast. Hot springs of the Blue Lagoon steam amid bitter winters. Rugged snow-covered terrain underneath a swirled canvas of Northern Lights. For the 330,000+ citizens of Iceland, this contrast can also be found in their quest for a satisfying life outside of their normal workweek. According to a recent study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Iceland ranks below average in work-life balance.

 

work-life balance in iceland

 

For a country that offers waterfalls, geysers, and volcanoes among its sought after outdoor sights, the problem many Icelanders face is finding the time to take advantage of their surroundings. Despite ranking high in such categories as employment, a sense of community, and being environmentally responsible, a concern for many in Iceland is working long hours and therefore not having adequate time to spend on personal and leisure activities. Nonetheless, Icelanders have a higher rate of satisfaction for their lives than the average responses surveyed by the OECD.

 

work-life balance in iceland

 

A high self-evaluation for Life Satisfaction in Iceland could be attributed to several causes, but the access to inimitable scenery is a point of jealousy for people the world over. Whether seeking out filming locations from Game of Thrones to channel one’s inner wildling or hiking alongside the Gullfoss Waterfall, Iceland has rich offerings for any outdoorsy adventurer. Though, with only a few hours of sunlight in winter, Iceland relies on more than natural beauty to engage its people.

 As presumed with any island, seafood is a staple component of an Icelandic diet, both for its accessibility and its tie to traditional work and survival. As most of us can relate to, the Icelandic have a growing appreciation for coffee, as evidenced by an increase in cafes and roasters, especially in the capital and largest city, Reykjavik. 

 

work-life balance in iceland

 

So, with all that Iceland has to offer, whether it’s a meal and visit to an art gallery in the city after work, a weekend hike along the coast, or a trip to a spa to unwind from it all, why do the Icelandic feel their work-life balance leaves something to be desired? Time. All the activities and attractions available to us are only meaningful if we have the time to appreciate them.

 

work-life balance in iceland

 

Getting the time away from work is key to recharge, and a shift towards prioritizing leisure time is not a simple change to make for a society that is driven towards workplace productivity. So, if you can punch the clock at a reasonable time, the potential for exploration of natural beauty and culturally rich opportunities are at your doorstep in Iceland.




Read about different work-life balances in other countries here

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photos via unsplash
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minimalist instagram inspiration https://mahabis.com/blogs/journal/minimalist-instagram-inspiration minimalist instagram inspiration
minimalist instagram inspiration
minimalist instagram inspiration
mahabis

minimalist instagram inspiration

 

Here at mahabis, we like things clean and simple, so we've put together a few lesser known minimalist accounts. Sit back, put your mahabis on, and let the simplicity of the images inspire you. 

 

geometry //

@danica_firulovic is a Sydney based artist who has transitioned from urban perspectives to 'Albescence' - a series exploring the meaning of white.

 

minimalist inspiration

 

minimalist inspiration

 

illustration //

From Bogota, Colombia, @mylastnameiscuadrado creates minimal but meaningful line drawn illustrations to light up your feed.

 

minimalist inspiration

 

minimalist inspiration

 

digital //

Hailing from far-flung Bengaluru in India, these digital creations are part of a wide aray of graphic and traditional art by @naman_daga. He'll infuse your feed with playful colour, pattern and line.

 

minimalist instagram inspiration

 

minimalist instagram inspiration

 

structure // 

@cheryl_fu explores structure and line in her surroundings using only an iphone and an excellent eye.

 

minimalist inspiration

 

minimalist instagram inspiration

 

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