• mahabis guide // the calming effects of hiking

 

Fresh air, dramatic views and a chance to stretch your legs; we all know that walking is good for your physical health, but were you aware that taking a long walk in the countryside can help to clear your mind and relieve stress?

Being cooped up indoors can hinder your creativity and reduce your productivity by limiting external stimulation. Nobody feels inspired by staring at the same four walls all day long. Taking a small break for a brisk walk around your local park can help, but there’s nothing quite like packing a backpack and setting off on a long hike to clear the cobwebs.

 

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

Picture the scene. You’re in the wilderness without any phone signal, hiking at a leisurely pace. Surrounded by snow-capped peaks, misty moorland or luscious forest, every vista is a photo opportunity. Whether you’re walking in a group or on your own, you have the time to appreciate your surroundings and gather your thoughts. Inspiration hits with every step you take, and the longer that you walk for, the further away the stresses of daily life seem to be.

  

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

The health benefits of getting back to nature have become more apparent in recent years. Doctors are prescribing 'nature therapy' to help reduce stress. Research demonstrates that people who have access to email have higher heart rates than those who are cut off from the internet. Unplugging, switching off and getting back to nature allows a well earned break from the chaos of modern life.

Wandering through the countryside, whether that’s a leisurely stroll through fields or a challenging climb up a mountain, helps your brain to become calmer, relieving brain fatigue and aiding concentration. The sound of leaves crunching underfoot, the feeling of the sun shining on your skin or, the smell of wild flowers in bloom; the bombardment of stimuli to all of your senses and the exertion from the physical effort all help to abolish stress and allow your mind to relax.

  

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

So, where are the best places to hike to clear your mind? We recommend getting out of the city and heading to your nearest national park. In the UK, the likes of the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales, the Cairngorms and Snowdonia beckon with their rolling hills, towering peaks and ancient woodlands. Further afield, the Norwegian fjords and Iceland’s Highlands provide ample hiking opportunities far removed from busy cities.

 

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

The USA and Canada are home to an abundance of both short and long hiking trails. The likes of the Pacific Crest Trail and the Appalachian Trail are more suited for serious hikers with several months to spare, but there are endless day or half-day hikes all across the continent. Some of our favourite hiking trails are along the Columbia River Gorge in Washington, in the Great Smokey Mountains, at Yosemite National Park and in British Columbia.

 

If you liked our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link

 

photos via unsplash

 

mahabis guide // the calming effects of hiking

 

Fresh air, dramatic views and a chance to stretch your legs; we all know that walking is good for your physical health, but were you aware that taking a long walk in the countryside can help to clear your mind and relieve stress?

Being cooped up indoors can hinder your creativity and reduce your productivity by limiting external stimulation. Nobody feels inspired by staring at the same four walls all day long. Taking a small break for a brisk walk around your local park can help, but there’s nothing quite like packing a backpack and setting off on a long hike to clear the cobwebs.

 

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

Picture the scene. You’re in the wilderness without any phone signal, hiking at a leisurely pace. Surrounded by snow-capped peaks, misty moorland or luscious forest, every vista is a photo opportunity. Whether you’re walking in a group or on your own, you have the time to appreciate your surroundings and gather your thoughts. Inspiration hits with every step you take, and the longer that you walk for, the further away the stresses of daily life seem to be.

  

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

The health benefits of getting back to nature have become more apparent in recent years. Doctors are prescribing 'nature therapy' to help reduce stress. Research demonstrates that people who have access to email have higher heart rates than those who are cut off from the internet. Unplugging, switching off and getting back to nature allows a well earned break from the chaos of modern life.

Wandering through the countryside, whether that’s a leisurely stroll through fields or a challenging climb up a mountain, helps your brain to become calmer, relieving brain fatigue and aiding concentration. The sound of leaves crunching underfoot, the feeling of the sun shining on your skin or, the smell of wild flowers in bloom; the bombardment of stimuli to all of your senses and the exertion from the physical effort all help to abolish stress and allow your mind to relax.

  

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

So, where are the best places to hike to clear your mind? We recommend getting out of the city and heading to your nearest national park. In the UK, the likes of the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales, the Cairngorms and Snowdonia beckon with their rolling hills, towering peaks and ancient woodlands. Further afield, the Norwegian fjords and Iceland’s Highlands provide ample hiking opportunities far removed from busy cities.

 

the calming effects of hiking // mahabis journal

 

The USA and Canada are home to an abundance of both short and long hiking trails. The likes of the Pacific Crest Trail and the Appalachian Trail are more suited for serious hikers with several months to spare, but there are endless day or half-day hikes all across the continent. Some of our favourite hiking trails are along the Columbia River Gorge in Washington, in the Great Smokey Mountains, at Yosemite National Park and in British Columbia.

 

If you liked our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link

 

photos via unsplash

 

  • Emma Lavelle
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