• mahabis journal // our guide to zero tasking day

 

Historically, most countries in the world adhered to daylight saving time as a way of maximising productivity during daylight hours. And yet, each year, more countries abandon the tradition, as it becomes less necessary in the modern world. As many countries still adhere to it, however, we focus on the benefits of having an extra hour, and how we can make the most of these benefits all year around.

 

mahabis journal // zero tasking day 

In the spring we tend to punish ourselves for the 'lost hour' - intent on getting more work done, ignoring the inevitable loss of an hours sleep. Those affected by upset sleep patterns force their bodies to work through it, focusing on the positive - the imminent arrival of the summer sun. The steady increase in daylight hours serves as the literal light at the end of the tunnel of winter. This helps somewhat to ease us through the spring time change.

Surely then, when it comes around to gaining the hour back in the autumn, that means we've already done all we need to do in it? Far from squeezing in an extra hour of work or chores, it's an hour we've earned of freedom from thought, stress and work. With no extra sunshine on the horizon, just early dusk and long nights, the autumn time change is traditionally the more difficult of the two. It needn't be.


mahabis guide // zero tasking

 

This is where the notion of Zero Tasking Day arises. Created by Nancy Christie, author of The Gifts of Change, Zero Tasking Day is 'a day is to fill that extra 60 minutes with nothing. In other words, take this "extra" time and rest, give yourself a break from all the hustle and bustle of your everyday life.' Much akin to the processes she discusses in her book, we are encouraged to take time to adapt to change, instead of ignoring or working through it. Christie believes we have more to gain from change if we re-evaluate and gain new perspective.

As a result, regardless of whether it's when we're getting that daylight savings hour back or not, we should try to grasp an hour where we can with both hands and claim it all to ourselves. In our ever-connected world, it is possible to underestimate the advantages of taking an hour to switch off. Indulge yourself for an hour in a book you've had on your shelf for a while, listen to some new music with a glass of wine, or go for a fresh winter walk, wrapped in soft wool crunching through the last of the autumn leaves.

 

mahabis guide // zero tasking day

 

There are many ways to switch off, and as with most things, it's important to find what works for you. (Our notes on downtime have inspiration on that topic.) This Sunday, why not forget striving to be more productive, and instead, why not strive to make some time for yourself. Find yourself clarity, relaxation and empty time. You may find your body and mind will thank you for it all winter.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

images // kari shea, nomao saekialejandro escamilla, worthy of elegance

mahabis journal // our guide to zero tasking day

 

Historically, most countries in the world adhered to daylight saving time as a way of maximising productivity during daylight hours. And yet, each year, more countries abandon the tradition, as it becomes less necessary in the modern world. As many countries still adhere to it, however, we focus on the benefits of having an extra hour, and how we can make the most of these benefits all year around.

 

mahabis journal // zero tasking day 

In the spring we tend to punish ourselves for the 'lost hour' - intent on getting more work done, ignoring the inevitable loss of an hours sleep. Those affected by upset sleep patterns force their bodies to work through it, focusing on the positive - the imminent arrival of the summer sun. The steady increase in daylight hours serves as the literal light at the end of the tunnel of winter. This helps somewhat to ease us through the spring time change.

Surely then, when it comes around to gaining the hour back in the autumn, that means we've already done all we need to do in it? Far from squeezing in an extra hour of work or chores, it's an hour we've earned of freedom from thought, stress and work. With no extra sunshine on the horizon, just early dusk and long nights, the autumn time change is traditionally the more difficult of the two. It needn't be.


mahabis guide // zero tasking

 

This is where the notion of Zero Tasking Day arises. Created by Nancy Christie, author of The Gifts of Change, Zero Tasking Day is 'a day is to fill that extra 60 minutes with nothing. In other words, take this "extra" time and rest, give yourself a break from all the hustle and bustle of your everyday life.' Much akin to the processes she discusses in her book, we are encouraged to take time to adapt to change, instead of ignoring or working through it. Christie believes we have more to gain from change if we re-evaluate and gain new perspective.

As a result, regardless of whether it's when we're getting that daylight savings hour back or not, we should try to grasp an hour where we can with both hands and claim it all to ourselves. In our ever-connected world, it is possible to underestimate the advantages of taking an hour to switch off. Indulge yourself for an hour in a book you've had on your shelf for a while, listen to some new music with a glass of wine, or go for a fresh winter walk, wrapped in soft wool crunching through the last of the autumn leaves.

 

mahabis guide // zero tasking day

 

There are many ways to switch off, and as with most things, it's important to find what works for you. (Our notes on downtime have inspiration on that topic.) This Sunday, why not forget striving to be more productive, and instead, why not strive to make some time for yourself. Find yourself clarity, relaxation and empty time. You may find your body and mind will thank you for it all winter.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share it via our ready-to-go tweet link.

 

images // kari shea, nomao saekialejandro escamilla, worthy of elegance
  • Author avatar
    Lauren Williams
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