• mahabis guide // winding down at the weekend

 

It’s a common experience to feel like your weekends are slipping away. With working hours creeping later and later, weekends should be our respite, where we don’t have to feel guilty about relaxing. But in fact, for most people it seems to be the opposite; Saturdays and Sundays are spent rushing around and attempting to cram in as much as possible. It’s time to reclaim our weekends for ‘me time’.

 

mahabis journal // slow weekends

 

Traditionally, Saturdays and Sundays have been seen as days of rest. They were the days that would be spent at leisure with the family. Over the decades, they have lost their meaning and have become associated with catching up on chores and making up for lost time in the week. Even those who seek to spend their time embracing a slower lifestyle can attempt to cram too much into their two days off a week.

When we work busy jobs and have little time to spend with our family and friends during the week, it can often become increasingly tempting to try and do too much at the weekend. But weekends are for winding down and recharging. So why not embrace a slower weekend and reclaim more time for ourselves? Whether that be lounging on the sofa, having a drink with friends, or getting out of the city - winding down can be whatever works for you. 

 

mahabis guide // slow weekends

 

It's sometimes a good idea to keep things to a minimum and allow plenty of time to yourself to rest and recuperate ready to face another working week. You don’t always have to have company to enjoy your weekends. Spending an evening on the sofa with a good book or catching up on your favourite TV series is more than fine. If your weekdays are a bombardment of people and information, then the weekends are the perfect opportunity to switch off and enjoy a little ‘me time’.

 

mahabis guide // winding down

 

There’s no reason to feel guilty about indulging in a lie in at the weekend. Most of us tend to wake at the crack of dawn during the week, so what are a few extra hours of lounging around or enjoying breakfast in bed on a Sunday morning? There's no need to make plans until early afternoon; instead why not enjoy long, lingering slow mornings where you take your time to rise, reading the Sunday papers in your slippers as you enjoy an indulgent brunch. It’s moments like these, when we slow down, and concentrate on the moment we're in, that we end up enjoying the simple pleasures in life. 

 

mahabis guide // winding down at the weekend

 

To get the most out of our weekends, and to really wind down, it makes sense to void your time of distractions, and simply focus on yourself. Of course, make time for family and friends, but be prepared to say no when you feel like you’ve taken on too much and you just fancy some me-time. Take things back a couple of decades and revisit the traditional use of the weekend; days of rest.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link

 

photos: via pexels, unsplash, flickr, elisabet dominguez, basti93

 

mahabis guide // winding down at the weekend

 

It’s a common experience to feel like your weekends are slipping away. With working hours creeping later and later, weekends should be our respite, where we don’t have to feel guilty about relaxing. But in fact, for most people it seems to be the opposite; Saturdays and Sundays are spent rushing around and attempting to cram in as much as possible. It’s time to reclaim our weekends for ‘me time’.

 

mahabis journal // slow weekends

 

Traditionally, Saturdays and Sundays have been seen as days of rest. They were the days that would be spent at leisure with the family. Over the decades, they have lost their meaning and have become associated with catching up on chores and making up for lost time in the week. Even those who seek to spend their time embracing a slower lifestyle can attempt to cram too much into their two days off a week.

When we work busy jobs and have little time to spend with our family and friends during the week, it can often become increasingly tempting to try and do too much at the weekend. But weekends are for winding down and recharging. So why not embrace a slower weekend and reclaim more time for ourselves? Whether that be lounging on the sofa, having a drink with friends, or getting out of the city - winding down can be whatever works for you. 

 

mahabis guide // slow weekends

 

It's sometimes a good idea to keep things to a minimum and allow plenty of time to yourself to rest and recuperate ready to face another working week. You don’t always have to have company to enjoy your weekends. Spending an evening on the sofa with a good book or catching up on your favourite TV series is more than fine. If your weekdays are a bombardment of people and information, then the weekends are the perfect opportunity to switch off and enjoy a little ‘me time’.

 

mahabis guide // winding down

 

There’s no reason to feel guilty about indulging in a lie in at the weekend. Most of us tend to wake at the crack of dawn during the week, so what are a few extra hours of lounging around or enjoying breakfast in bed on a Sunday morning? There's no need to make plans until early afternoon; instead why not enjoy long, lingering slow mornings where you take your time to rise, reading the Sunday papers in your slippers as you enjoy an indulgent brunch. It’s moments like these, when we slow down, and concentrate on the moment we're in, that we end up enjoying the simple pleasures in life. 

 

mahabis guide // winding down at the weekend

 

To get the most out of our weekends, and to really wind down, it makes sense to void your time of distractions, and simply focus on yourself. Of course, make time for family and friends, but be prepared to say no when you feel like you’ve taken on too much and you just fancy some me-time. Take things back a couple of decades and revisit the traditional use of the weekend; days of rest.

 

If you enjoyed reading our post, feel free to share via our ready-to-go tweet link

 

photos: via pexels, unsplash, flickr, elisabet dominguez, basti93

 

  • Emma Lavelle
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