• five questions with Jamie Day

blogger and podcaster (plus dad/climbing frame/ponytail fixer/Lego master builder)

 


New Year can be a tricky time for some. We kick the year off by making ambitious and usually health related promises to ourselves, when in reality it’s the time of year we need to stay in and recoup the most. 

 

So we asked mental health podcaster, Jamie Day, about setting realistic New Year’s resolutions that won’t make you feel terrible when you’re on drink three by day three of Dry Jan.

 

 






QUESTION ONE Do you think New Year's resolutions are good for mental health? Or are there other ways we should be setting up success for the year to come?


I’ve never been a fan of New Year’s resolutions. We’re all so, so busy, that grand declarations of alternative lifestyle choices often flop when we get to February.

Unachievable and elaborate changes that are never fulfilled can be quite demoralising, especially if they’re health focussed.

I think it’s better to consider smaller, achievable steps rather than gargantuan adjustments, that way you’re more likely to grow over the year.



 


QUESTION TWO  Will you be making resolutions/goals for 2020?

Over the last few years I’ve been trying to focus on causes and issues that are close to my heart, like helping others with their mental health, living more sustainably and raising awareness about climate change.

I want to continue doing that in 2020.

With social media as huge as it is, it’s relatively easy to deliver thought-provoking messages, and if you impact even one person’s life it’s worthwhile.




QUESTION THREE  
For someone struggling with mental health, what’s a positive or healthy goal they should set themselves for 2020? 

Take each day as it comes and don’t set targets such as ‘I’m going to be off my antidepressants by the summer’ or ‘because Susan in accounts told me yoga was the answer to her problems, it’s going to be perfect for me too’.

Managing our mental health is such a personal experience; what works for one person might not work for you.

But do focus on small day-to-day achievable targets like getting enough sleep, having a shower, brushing your teeth, eating well and getting some exercise and fresh air.

Small steps in maintaining self-care can allow us to consider the help that’s out there with some greater clarity.

 



QUESTION FOUR Wellness and mental health had a big year in 2019. What do you think the wellness trends of 2020 will be?


As I said above, self-care is so important, and I really believe this.

Thankfully because of social media, self-care is no longer considered a luxury or something that’s selfish and self-indulgent; it’s a necessity for all of us.

I think in the past, self-care has been confused with people dashing off for a spa weekend in the English countryside.

And it might be for some of us, but everyday self-care can be as simple as having a nice bath, reading a book or taking the dogs out.

Whatever it might be, it’s vital we all get a little time out to relax, process our thoughts and reset if necessary.





QUESTION FIVE Blue Monday is coming up on 20th January, which is said to be a hard day due to the weather, the end of the holidays, and the arrival of bills. What’s your advice on getting through days like this?

Don’t listen to the noise that fills our papers and social media feeds.

So many people might just carry on with the day if they weren’t aware of the mood-sucking label the day has been given.

But if you are affected, concentrate on self-care, don’t fall into any traps of retail therapy that the brands want you to be sucked into (thus creating more bills) and try and use January as a month to relax and slow down after the Christmas chaos.


 


 

5 bonus quickfire questions 

1. Favourite relaxation app?

I’ve used Headspace in the past, I’m trying Mind Detox at the moment, but in truth, my favourite app for relaxing is Spotify. Listening to some good music is such a release for me.

2. The thing you’re most looking forward to in 2020?

Apart from Wolves challenging for a Champions League place? Erm, hopefully seeing my business get off the ground and my seeing my kids grow into even more incredible little humans than they already are.

3. Did you achieve all your 2019 resolutions?

My only goal was to not use any plastic bottles or coffee cups. Except for when we were on holiday and the tap water was unsafe to drink, I’ve achieved it, and it was ridiculously easy to do too. Everyone should give it a go. We never leave the house without our phone, wallet and keys, so just add a reusable coffee cup and water bottle to that list of essentials, and voila – saving money and the planet!

4. Best way to spend a morning?

Mornings at the weekend or in the school holidays are the best. A bit slower than usual, a big breakfast at the table, and a nice long dog walk.

5. Award you’d most love to win

I’ve been a father for 7 years now and I still haven’t received a ‘best dad in the world’ mug. Everyone else seems to get one on Father’s Day, whereas I just seem to get socks.

 

 







 

 

you can follow Jamie on Instagram @adayinthelifedad or listen to his Man Talk podcast here.

 

 

 

five questions with Jamie Day

blogger and podcaster (plus dad/climbing frame/ponytail fixer/Lego master builder)

 


New Year can be a tricky time for some. We kick the year off by making ambitious and usually health related promises to ourselves, when in reality it’s the time of year we need to stay in and recoup the most. 

 

So we asked mental health podcaster, Jamie Day, about setting realistic New Year’s resolutions that won’t make you feel terrible when you’re on drink three by day three of Dry Jan.

 

 






QUESTION ONE Do you think New Year's resolutions are good for mental health? Or are there other ways we should be setting up success for the year to come?


I’ve never been a fan of New Year’s resolutions. We’re all so, so busy, that grand declarations of alternative lifestyle choices often flop when we get to February.

Unachievable and elaborate changes that are never fulfilled can be quite demoralising, especially if they’re health focussed.

I think it’s better to consider smaller, achievable steps rather than gargantuan adjustments, that way you’re more likely to grow over the year.



 


QUESTION TWO  Will you be making resolutions/goals for 2020?

Over the last few years I’ve been trying to focus on causes and issues that are close to my heart, like helping others with their mental health, living more sustainably and raising awareness about climate change.

I want to continue doing that in 2020.

With social media as huge as it is, it’s relatively easy to deliver thought-provoking messages, and if you impact even one person’s life it’s worthwhile.




QUESTION THREE  
For someone struggling with mental health, what’s a positive or healthy goal they should set themselves for 2020? 

Take each day as it comes and don’t set targets such as ‘I’m going to be off my antidepressants by the summer’ or ‘because Susan in accounts told me yoga was the answer to her problems, it’s going to be perfect for me too’.

Managing our mental health is such a personal experience; what works for one person might not work for you.

But do focus on small day-to-day achievable targets like getting enough sleep, having a shower, brushing your teeth, eating well and getting some exercise and fresh air.

Small steps in maintaining self-care can allow us to consider the help that’s out there with some greater clarity.

 



QUESTION FOUR Wellness and mental health had a big year in 2019. What do you think the wellness trends of 2020 will be?


As I said above, self-care is so important, and I really believe this.

Thankfully because of social media, self-care is no longer considered a luxury or something that’s selfish and self-indulgent; it’s a necessity for all of us.

I think in the past, self-care has been confused with people dashing off for a spa weekend in the English countryside.

And it might be for some of us, but everyday self-care can be as simple as having a nice bath, reading a book or taking the dogs out.

Whatever it might be, it’s vital we all get a little time out to relax, process our thoughts and reset if necessary.





QUESTION FIVE Blue Monday is coming up on 20th January, which is said to be a hard day due to the weather, the end of the holidays, and the arrival of bills. What’s your advice on getting through days like this?

Don’t listen to the noise that fills our papers and social media feeds.

So many people might just carry on with the day if they weren’t aware of the mood-sucking label the day has been given.

But if you are affected, concentrate on self-care, don’t fall into any traps of retail therapy that the brands want you to be sucked into (thus creating more bills) and try and use January as a month to relax and slow down after the Christmas chaos.


 


 

5 bonus quickfire questions 

1. Favourite relaxation app?

I’ve used Headspace in the past, I’m trying Mind Detox at the moment, but in truth, my favourite app for relaxing is Spotify. Listening to some good music is such a release for me.

2. The thing you’re most looking forward to in 2020?

Apart from Wolves challenging for a Champions League place? Erm, hopefully seeing my business get off the ground and my seeing my kids grow into even more incredible little humans than they already are.

3. Did you achieve all your 2019 resolutions?

My only goal was to not use any plastic bottles or coffee cups. Except for when we were on holiday and the tap water was unsafe to drink, I’ve achieved it, and it was ridiculously easy to do too. Everyone should give it a go. We never leave the house without our phone, wallet and keys, so just add a reusable coffee cup and water bottle to that list of essentials, and voila – saving money and the planet!

4. Best way to spend a morning?

Mornings at the weekend or in the school holidays are the best. A bit slower than usual, a big breakfast at the table, and a nice long dog walk.

5. Award you’d most love to win

I’ve been a father for 7 years now and I still haven’t received a ‘best dad in the world’ mug. Everyone else seems to get one on Father’s Day, whereas I just seem to get socks.

 

 







 

 

you can follow Jamie on Instagram @adayinthelifedad or listen to his Man Talk podcast here.