• discovering loten, norway

 

 

The home of artist and national treasure Edvard Munch, Loten captures the quintessential pasturelands of the Norwegian countryside. Wooden homes painted red sit flush against green fields, lakes shimmer like glass beneath winter ice, and the fir forests are as thick and dark as a fairytale.

Norway boasts a wild and untamed landscape -  a vision of ribbon like fjords and towering snowy peaks, but Loten takes a gentler approach and has been famed for farming for centuries. The name itself comes from an old Norse word for farm and many Norwegians would associate these sweet meadows as being the signature spot for clotted berry jams, fresh juices, and the national drink – Akevitt.

 

 

loten, norway

 

 

The history books tell tales of trade and industry winding through the roads that lead through Loten, mostly around the footpaths that meander around the 13th century church. But it was a man born in the snowdrifts of winter in 1863 that makes Loten so famous. Edvard Munch, one of the most famed painters of the late 19th century took his first breaths in a farmhouse up in Adalsbruk. Art lovers can take the Munch Trail, cycling from the Munch Center at the Klevfos Museum.

Travelers heading to Loten will find a slice of traditional home life waiting, although many will visit to wander the borderlands that separate the glimmering wheat fields of Eastern Norway from the south lake lands of Mjosa, and the shadowy forests that run all the way to Siberia. In the white and black winter months, this area entices cross country skiers looking to swish along the open powder soft pastures.

 

 

loten, norway

 

 

 

In the town itself you can visit the old distillery buildings, now turned into beautiful candle making shops, antiquated bookstores, and a delicious café serving up homemade food and designed from the bits and pieces of old Loten – from tiles to vintage cladding and doors. The Kelvfos Industrial Museum is another fascinating spot for those who want to take a closer look at the old world working days of Norway.

Nature calls in this dazzling and scenic part of the country, from fishing in the winding rivers, cold water lakes and tarns of Hedmarksvidda, to wandering the cultural farm strewn path of Ottestad. Bird lovers will also swoon at the swampland area along the Svartelv River, where in the sweetness of spring, fills with ducks and geese and other water birds who flock to the fullness of the area.

 

 

discovering loten, norway

 

 

The home of artist and national treasure Edvard Munch, Loten captures the quintessential pasturelands of the Norwegian countryside. Wooden homes painted red sit flush against green fields, lakes shimmer like glass beneath winter ice, and the fir forests are as thick and dark as a fairytale.

Norway boasts a wild and untamed landscape -  a vision of ribbon like fjords and towering snowy peaks, but Loten takes a gentler approach and has been famed for farming for centuries. The name itself comes from an old Norse word for farm and many Norwegians would associate these sweet meadows as being the signature spot for clotted berry jams, fresh juices, and the national drink – Akevitt.

 

 

loten, norway

 

 

The history books tell tales of trade and industry winding through the roads that lead through Loten, mostly around the footpaths that meander around the 13th century church. But it was a man born in the snowdrifts of winter in 1863 that makes Loten so famous. Edvard Munch, one of the most famed painters of the late 19th century took his first breaths in a farmhouse up in Adalsbruk. Art lovers can take the Munch Trail, cycling from the Munch Center at the Klevfos Museum.

Travelers heading to Loten will find a slice of traditional home life waiting, although many will visit to wander the borderlands that separate the glimmering wheat fields of Eastern Norway from the south lake lands of Mjosa, and the shadowy forests that run all the way to Siberia. In the white and black winter months, this area entices cross country skiers looking to swish along the open powder soft pastures.

 

 

loten, norway

 

 

 

In the town itself you can visit the old distillery buildings, now turned into beautiful candle making shops, antiquated bookstores, and a delicious café serving up homemade food and designed from the bits and pieces of old Loten – from tiles to vintage cladding and doors. The Kelvfos Industrial Museum is another fascinating spot for those who want to take a closer look at the old world working days of Norway.

Nature calls in this dazzling and scenic part of the country, from fishing in the winding rivers, cold water lakes and tarns of Hedmarksvidda, to wandering the cultural farm strewn path of Ottestad. Bird lovers will also swoon at the swampland area along the Svartelv River, where in the sweetness of spring, fills with ducks and geese and other water birds who flock to the fullness of the area.

 

 

  • Author avatar
    Sarah Lopeman
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