• mahabis photoessay // long coffees. slow living.

Spanish food photographer and writer, Mia Sarri, focuses her work on the concept of slow living and taking time over the preparation of food and drink. Read on to discover her atmospheric images that will have you craving a freshly brewed coffee, and to discover more about the slow living movement.

 

 

Mia’s series of images based around preparing a cup of coffee demonstrates to viewers the practice of taking time to create the perfect brew, as opposed to the modern culture of grabbing a quick takeaway cup from Starbucks. Taking time to savour the little things in life (such as an aromatic cup of coffee) allows us to live a more balanced life.

 

 

Slow living encompasses a ‘less is more’ concept, encouraging us to take a step back and enjoy activities such as preparing food from scratch, knitting and gardening, rather than taking things for granted and subscribing to a culture that is full of shortcuts.

Not only is this a more fulfilling way to live, but by embracing a slow living mentality to the way that you eat, drink and travel, you are protecting the environment around you and nurturing your body.

 

 

Look at the differences between instant coffee and freshly ground coffee. Popularised with rations during the Second World War, freeze dried and spray dried coffee go through vigorous chemical processes and have even been linked to the malabsorption of iron, as well as being renowned for being bitter and acidic in taste.

Aside from the enjoyable process of grinding then brewing your own coffee (inciting debates over your preferred method of cafetiere, aeropress or drip brew), it also guarantees a smooth, rich and delicious cup.

 

 

The rich colours and dim lighting of Mia’s photographs help to conjure up visions of a steaming cup of Joe, whilst the appearance of traditional coffee equipment instantly evoke nostalgic feelings and a sentiment for a slower way of life.

 

  

View more of Mia’s photography here and check out her website whilst slipping on your pair of mahabis and relaxing with a freshly ground and brewed cup of coffee. To give this article a share, simply click on this ready-to-go tweet

mahabis photoessay // long coffees. slow living.

Spanish food photographer and writer, Mia Sarri, focuses her work on the concept of slow living and taking time over the preparation of food and drink. Read on to discover her atmospheric images that will have you craving a freshly brewed coffee, and to discover more about the slow living movement.

 

 

Mia’s series of images based around preparing a cup of coffee demonstrates to viewers the practice of taking time to create the perfect brew, as opposed to the modern culture of grabbing a quick takeaway cup from Starbucks. Taking time to savour the little things in life (such as an aromatic cup of coffee) allows us to live a more balanced life.

 

 

Slow living encompasses a ‘less is more’ concept, encouraging us to take a step back and enjoy activities such as preparing food from scratch, knitting and gardening, rather than taking things for granted and subscribing to a culture that is full of shortcuts.

Not only is this a more fulfilling way to live, but by embracing a slow living mentality to the way that you eat, drink and travel, you are protecting the environment around you and nurturing your body.

 

 

Look at the differences between instant coffee and freshly ground coffee. Popularised with rations during the Second World War, freeze dried and spray dried coffee go through vigorous chemical processes and have even been linked to the malabsorption of iron, as well as being renowned for being bitter and acidic in taste.

Aside from the enjoyable process of grinding then brewing your own coffee (inciting debates over your preferred method of cafetiere, aeropress or drip brew), it also guarantees a smooth, rich and delicious cup.

 

 

The rich colours and dim lighting of Mia’s photographs help to conjure up visions of a steaming cup of Joe, whilst the appearance of traditional coffee equipment instantly evoke nostalgic feelings and a sentiment for a slower way of life.

 

  

View more of Mia’s photography here and check out her website whilst slipping on your pair of mahabis and relaxing with a freshly ground and brewed cup of coffee. To give this article a share, simply click on this ready-to-go tweet

  • Emma Lavelle
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