• mahabis retreats // 'specere', the timber mountain shelter

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Specere is the Latin word for 'to see'; the perfect name for this secluded structure that beautifully frames it's surroundings in its numerous openings

Located on the top of the 1900 foot summit of Deadwater Fell, Northumberland, this stark timber structure provides shelter from the exposed elements, and offers spectacular views of the surrounding countryside.

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Specere was designed by renowned architect David Adjaye as a refuge for fell walkers and mountain bikers. The stark structure works perfectly as both a dramatic sculpture and a shelter, bridging the space between functionality and creativity. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

The back of the building is completely sealed to protect from the southwesterly winds, but another side is perforated, and the front is completely open, revealing the view of Kielder Water & Forest Park below. Walkers rest on the bench just inside the opening; refuelling, rejuvenating and resting before they continue on their journey. On clear days, visitors can see both the Irish Sea to the west and the North Sea to the east. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Constructed from Douglas Fir timber, the shelter was built from a series of individual portal frames that were designed for maximum stability on a peak that is often battered by the elements. The unusual angular building and its black walls don't immediately create the impression of warmth, safety and relaxation, instead creating a stark and dramatic aesthetic that conjures up imagery of military structures. It is once you enter the building that a sense of calm surrounds you, enabling you to rest. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

There are influences from traditional Japanese and Norwegian architecture here, with the wooden frame, sharp angles, clean lines and large windows. Overall, however, the overwhelming aesthetic is refreshingly modern, creating the perfect contrast against its natural surroundings. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Ultimately, this is the ideal place for quiet reflection and enjoying your downtime, looking down on the countryside below with a sense of achievement following your climb. Rest, unwind and soak in the views before making a slow descent. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal 

Click on this ready-to-go tweet to share this post. 

photos: all phillip roberts 

 

mahabis retreats // 'specere', the timber mountain shelter

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Specere is the Latin word for 'to see'; the perfect name for this secluded structure that beautifully frames it's surroundings in its numerous openings

Located on the top of the 1900 foot summit of Deadwater Fell, Northumberland, this stark timber structure provides shelter from the exposed elements, and offers spectacular views of the surrounding countryside.

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Specere was designed by renowned architect David Adjaye as a refuge for fell walkers and mountain bikers. The stark structure works perfectly as both a dramatic sculpture and a shelter, bridging the space between functionality and creativity. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

The back of the building is completely sealed to protect from the southwesterly winds, but another side is perforated, and the front is completely open, revealing the view of Kielder Water & Forest Park below. Walkers rest on the bench just inside the opening; refuelling, rejuvenating and resting before they continue on their journey. On clear days, visitors can see both the Irish Sea to the west and the North Sea to the east. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Constructed from Douglas Fir timber, the shelter was built from a series of individual portal frames that were designed for maximum stability on a peak that is often battered by the elements. The unusual angular building and its black walls don't immediately create the impression of warmth, safety and relaxation, instead creating a stark and dramatic aesthetic that conjures up imagery of military structures. It is once you enter the building that a sense of calm surrounds you, enabling you to rest. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

There are influences from traditional Japanese and Norwegian architecture here, with the wooden frame, sharp angles, clean lines and large windows. Overall, however, the overwhelming aesthetic is refreshingly modern, creating the perfect contrast against its natural surroundings. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal

 

Ultimately, this is the ideal place for quiet reflection and enjoying your downtime, looking down on the countryside below with a sense of achievement following your climb. Rest, unwind and soak in the views before making a slow descent. 

 

specere by phillip roberts // mahabis journal 

Click on this ready-to-go tweet to share this post. 

photos: all phillip roberts 

 

  • Emma Lavelle
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